woofer

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woofer

a loudspeaker used in high-fidelity systems for the reproduction of low audio frequencies
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

woofer

[′wu̇f·ər]
(engineering acoustics)
A large loudspeaker designed to reproduce low audio frequencies at relatively high power levels; usually used in combination with a crossover network and a high-frequency loudspeaker called a tweeter.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

woofer

(jargon)
(University of Waterloo) Some varieties of wide paper for printers have a perforation 8.5 inches from the left margin that allows the 3.5 inch excess on the right-hand side to be torn off when the print format is 80 columns or less wide. If done with sufficient aplomb this makes a sound like the "woof" of a dog. If the large part is the "woofer" then the small part must obviously be the "tweeter", following the names for the large and small cones in a hi-fi loudspeaker.

These terms have been in use at Waterloo since 1972, but are unknown elsewhere.

Compare chad.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

woofer

A low-frequency loudspeaker. A hi-fi speaker cabinet typically contains a low-frequency bass speaker (woofer), a mid-frequency midrange speaker and a high-frequency treble speaker (the tweeter). In a two-way system, only woofers and tweeters are used. However, there are countless high-fidelity loudspeaker configurations on the market, many with more than one speaker of the same type within the enclosure. See subwoofer.
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References in periodicals archive ?
More successful was the Eleganza Flat Screen InvisiSound Frame Sound System ($4,000), a "picture frame" for your plasma monitor that includes a super-tweeter, many tweeters, and a half dozen small woofers on each side and the top to produce the left, right and center channels.
The X-30 was then configured for a 50-Hz sub/ sat crossover point, allowing the Dunlavy woofers to fill in the middle bass between roughly 100 and 60 Hz to good effect and earn their keep.
Actually, at least with full-range systems placed in typical locations, this suckout phenomenon is more likely to be a problem in the middle bass, instead of in the low bass, because the woofers in such systems tend to be fairly close to room boundaries.
Yep, two woofers and two subwoofers, plus the mid/tweeter sections, add up to quite a package.
Even then you are going to have problems if you do not provide some sort of electronic driver compensation for the phase response changes that occur at 5 times the cutoff frequency of the woofer (details of this are in a paper that a student presented in March at an AES conference and will be printed in an AES journal in October).
As I noted in my review, the two outboard woofer sections were not able to get up high enough to dovetail properly with the satellite poles.
These are terrific little woofers that are nearly as linear down at the
They go on to add that bi-wiring isolates the woofers'
On the other hand, the woofers were very attenuated in output by the time they reached up to 180 Hz, and this was the case even with their low-pass adjustment set for maximum high-frequency extension.
The woofers can be placed where they will work best in a given room.
At the bottom of the column, there is an 8-inch, side-mounted woofer. The woofer system is a reflex design, with a flared port on the back.
The SC-UA7 positions four 6-cm tweeters and four 8-cm midrange woofers in the front, left, and right sides to achieve a full 180A[bar] of Room-Filling Expansive Sound.