Woolf


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Woolf

1. Leonard Sidney. 1880--1969, English publisher and political writer
2. his wife, Virginia. 1882--1941, English novelist and critic. Her novels, which include Mrs Dalloway (1925), To the Lighthouse (1927), The Waves (1931), and Between the Acts (1941), employ such techniques as the interior monologue and stream of consciousness
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Simpson's Woolf: A Guide for the Perplexed differs from other academic guide books on Woolf--for instance, Anna Snaith's Palgrave Advances in Virginia Woolf Studies (2007), Jane Goldman's The Cambridge Introduction to Virginia Woolf (2006), and Sue Roe and Susan Sellers's The Cambridge Companion to Virginia Woolf (2000).
There are, in fact, two different spy novels in which Virginia Woolf herself serves as the heroic protagonist.
Police said Woolf led the woman away from the station before dragging her into the tent.
almost forty years of life, all built on that, permeated by that: so much I could never explain"- these childhood memories inspired the settings and themes of English author Virginia Woolf's powerful stream-of-consciousness narratives, write Google on its website.
Virginia Woolf and The Waves (1931): The Arising of Existential Meaninglessness
"Heritage" is a duplicitous term with a range of invested meanings, and the essays remain alert to the several problems that the theme presents, not only in its own terms, but also in connection with Woolf whose responses to the concept were ambivalent at best.
McGregor has long been at the cutting edge of ballet, working with collaborators from across the artistic world, and in this work, he combines themes from three of Woolf's landmark novels -- Mrs Dalloway, Orlando and The Waves -- with elements of her letters, essays and diaries.
In Essays on the Self, Kavenna opposes our current interest in the self with Woolf's and other Modernist writers' preoccupation with the subjective self.
Describing the early days of the project as "hitting our head against a brick wall," Woolf said that "we had a dogged kind of persistence," and once the team began attempting to create the neurons directly from mouse and human skin cells, everything began to fall into place.
But the chairman of the Home Affairs Select Committee Keith Vaz said there were seven drafts of the letter and the final version "gave a sense of greater detachment" between Lord and Lady Brittan and Mrs Woolf than her previous attempts.
Virginia Woolf's Life as We Have Known It preface and its variant sister-text, 'Memories of a Working Women's Guild,' have elicited widely differing reactions from critics of her work due to their ambivalent portrayal of the working-class women present at the 1913 Congress and the authors of Life as We Have Known It.