speech balloon

(redirected from Word balloon)
Also found in: Dictionary.

speech balloon

A graphic element taken from comic books that is widely used to convey messages in all forms of publications, including websites. The balloon is a bubble filled with text that points to a person or human-like object. Also called "speech bubbles," "voice bubbles," "word balloons" and "text balloons."


Speech Bubbles
If the text is meant to be silent, the bubble's pointer consists of smaller bubbles. Loud screams and shouts are exaggerated with jagged edges.
References in periodicals archive ?
Where should we place the word balloons and the blurb?
However, most 3D chat systems such as Second Life and IMVU have not considered the relationship between agents since they mainly use 2D-stylized word balloons of the same size and manage chat dialogues regardless of all 3D spatial information.
You may find, though, that you want to get more into those elements of graphic novels that are unique to the medium: panel-to-panel action, manga-style layouts, even the subtle effects that can be achieved through word balloon placement.
To fill the child's word balloon, she wrote, "An Illudium Q-36 Explosive Space Modulator?
It's like they're blowing up this huge word balloon, and all you have to do is pop it.
Debbie Millman, host of the popular podcast 'Design Matters', said the bubbles resembled the word balloons found in comic strips.
In addition to the features usually found in painting software, MediBang Paint Tablet comes with numerous customizable brushes, layers complete with blending modes, downloadable textures, tones, backgrounds, and word balloons for artist to use.
Abrera began drawing the "Kikomachine" comic strip in 2000 and, since then, his strips have become distinctively wordheavy, with the text barely fitting in the available word balloons.
Dramatic pictures and informative word balloons convey the major milestones of Gandhi's life and reveal his quiet determination throughout attack and even imprisonment.
Western comics have their own logical progression in terms of page layout and arrangements, of captioning and word balloons, and deviating from these standards causes predictable and aggravating bottlenecks in the reading experience.
Taken together, these two chapters closely scrutinize the interplay of words and images in Watchmen, from panel composition and word balloons, to words implying actions and words within the images giving the art context.
Graphic novels require similar activity, as they include text in word balloons that convey characters' utterances and thoughts, as well as narration boxes that provide setting, background, and plot information.