Worden, John Lorimer

Worden, John Lorimer

(wûr`dən), 1818–97, American naval officer, b. Westchester co., N.Y. Appointed midshipman in 1834, he saw varied service before the Civil War. Worden was captured (Apr., 1861) by the Confederates and held prisoner for seven months. Shortly after his exchange, he assumed command of the new ironclad Monitor. In the famous battle of Monitor and MerrimackMonitor and Merrimack,
two American warships that fought the first engagement between ironclad ships. When, at the beginning of the Civil War, the Union forces abandoned the Norfolk Navy Yard at Portsmouth, Va., they scuttled the powerful steam frigate Merrimack.
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, Worden was wounded in the face and temporarily blinded. Later he saw service with the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron (1862–63). Promoted to rear admiral in 1872, Worden was (1869–74) superintendent of Annapolis and commanded (1875–77) the European squadron.
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Worden, John Lorimer

(1818–97) naval officer; born in Westchester County, N.Y. He commanded the new ironclad USS Monitor in its epic but indecisive battle with the CSS Virginia in 1862; he was temporarily blinded during the battle. He later became the superintendent of the Naval Academy (1869–74) and commander of the European Squadron (1875–77).
The Cambridge Dictionary of American Biography, by John S. Bowman. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995. Reproduced with permission.