working day

(redirected from Working time)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Wikipedia.
Related to Working time: Working hours

working day

(esp US), workday
Commerce any day of the week except Sunday, public holidays, and, in some cases, Saturday
References in periodicals archive ?
In accordance with Article 12 of the Records on Work and Social Security Act, the employer must, among other things, keep records on the use of working time. The record of working time is not only intended for the need to calculate wages, as is often the opinion expressed by employers, but is very important in terms of properly securing labor rights in the field of working time, breaks and rest.
As we are still part of the EU, technically the WTR should be amended to expressly require employers to record working time as directed by the ECJ, but there is of course a question mark in relation to Brexit.
"As the council is not generally the main place of work for the council members, the working time must be organized so that it takes into consideration the interests of all council members, including their need to continue working in their principal job position.
At 23C there was no significant difference between the working time of Aq M and Extr M, which were significantly longer than Elt M.
Unfortunately, if you are entitled to spend the time on-call at home, this will not count as working time for the purpose of calculating your hours under the Working Time Regulation or in terms of the national minimum wage.
The travel time was therefore not paid and was included in an employees break for the purposes of the Working Time Directive.
The workers considered that this should be deemed as working time on the basis that they did not have a fixed place of work.
When handing down his opinion earlier this year, the Advocate General (AG) said the travel time should be classified as working time. The ECJ has agreed and declared where workers do not have a fixed or habitual place of work, the time spent by workers travelling each day between their homes and the premises of the first and last customers designated by their employer constitutes "working time".
THE European Court of Justice decided this week that for workers who do not have a fixed or habitual place of work, time spent travelling between their homes and the premises of the first and last customers designated by their employer constitutes "working time" within the meaning of the EU Working Time Directive.
With immediate effect, workers who travel from home, to and from a variety of locations, should have travel time to and from their first and last appointments of the day, counted as working time under the Working Time Directive.
Few-year observation being an answer to that question prompts the author to a critically formulated hypothesis: nursing positions in Poland are in significant proportion subject to non-compliance with proper proportions of working time intervals in relation to a whole working time, which might result in overwork of an employee, causing further loss of efficiency or quality of provided services.
There will be no legislative proposals on working time under the current Commission.