Wortcunning

Wortcunning

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

The knowledge of the use of herbs in healing, both medicinally and magically. Hedge Witches, Wiccans, Pagans, Wise Men and Women, Cunningmen and women all had wortcunning, as do many of today's Witches.

Many of the healers and magical practitioners grew their own plants for healing and magical use, but others felt it was more important to find the plant growing in the wild.

The harvesting was frequently done according to the phases of the moon or by the Planetary Hours and the Planetary Rulers, depending upon the need and the use of the plant. The herbs were usually cut with a boleen, a curved-bladed knife used only for that purpose. They could be used fresh or dried for future use.

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Leechdoms, wortcunning, and starcraft of early England, vol.
"Beowulf: The Monsters and the Critics" does not start with the opening lines of Beowulf the poem, but instead with the Reverend Oswald Cockayne--best known for his three-volume Leechdoms, Wortcunning and Starcraft of Early England.
Oswald Cockayne, Leechdoms, Wortcunning and Starcraft of Early England, vol.
Cockayne, Leechdome, Wortcunning, and Starcraft of Early England, 3 vols (London, 1864-6), I, 378.
Feminine forms are often used to describe the sun's motion, as in Leechdoms, Wortcunning and Starcraft:
"Lacnunga." Leechdoms, Wortcunning, and Starcraft of Early England Being a Collection of Documents, for the Most Part Never Before Printed, Illustrating the History of Science in This Country Before the Norman Conquest.
Thus, Bodley Homilies and Vespasian Homilies have no in-Phs in the 11760 words of the texts and Peri Didaxeon, Leechdoms, Wortcunning, and Starcraft of Early England includes only 8 instances in its 7350 words (0.1088%), whereas Juliane and Katherine (The Katherine Group) incorporate 131 tokens (81+54) in the 12110 words (7180+4930) of the texts, with the rate of 1.0817.
See also Leechdoms, Wortcunning, and Starcraft of Early England, 3 vols., coll.
Balfour, EETS 137 (London, 1909), 110, and Leechdoms, Wortcunning, and Starcraft of Early England, ed.
New York: Dover, 1958), 160; by Oswald Cockagne, Leechdoms, Wortcunning, and Starcraft of Early England (London: Longman, 1864-1866), 1:395; by G.
Cockayne, Leechdoms, Wortcunning and Starcraft of Early England, 3 vols (London, 1864-6), ii.34.