forearm

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Related to Wrist muscles: Forearm muscles

forearm

the part of the arm from the elbow to the wrist
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Forearm

 

the part of the human upper limb from above the elbow to the hand. The radius and ulna are the skeletal foundation of the forearm and form the distal and proximal radioulnar articulation, which make possible rotational movements around the axis of the ulna. The bones of the forearm serve as points of attachment of the muscles that move the shoulder, wrist, and fingers. Deep vessels and nerves are found in the intermuscular spaces of the forearm. These include the radial and ulnar arteries and veins and the radial, ulnar, and median nerves. The subcutaneous fatty tissue of the forearm contains superficial nerves and veins. Traumas can involve not only injury to soft tissue but also possible simple or compound fractures of one or both bones of the forearm; frequently, the lower joint end of the radius is involved.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

forearm

[′fȯr‚ärm]
(anatomy)
The part of the upper extremity between the wrist and the elbow. Also known as antebrachium.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Characteristic Experimental Control Group Group n=15 n=16 37 47 Age (yr), mean (SD) (16) (20) Male participants, n (%) 12 (80) 15 (94) Time since injury (yr), 1 0.4 median (IQR) (3.7) (0.9) Wrist muscle trained, n (%) Extensors 13 (87) 15 (94) Flexors 2 (13) 1 (6) ASIA Scale, n (%) A 9 (60) 6 (38) B 0 (0) 4 (25) C 3 (20) 2 (12) D 3 (20) 4 (25) Initial muscle grade, n (%) 2 4 (27) 0 (0) 2.5 * -- 2 (12) 3 5 (33) 7 (44) 3.5 * -- 3 (19) 4 6 (40) 4 (25) ASIA = American Spinal Injury Association; * = half grades due to the average of the two control hands Table 2.
The patient was administered HIV-tainted unheated blood on three occasions between May and June 1985 at Teikyo University Hospital in Tokyo to treat bleeding in his wrist muscles.
The Exer-Twist conditions and helps warm up wrist muscles and allows physically inactive people to exercise upper body muscles.
Ergonomic studies show that the traditional computer mouse stresses the delicate hand and wrist muscles, which can lead to repetitive stress injuries.