Wu San-Kuei

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Wu San-Kuei

 

Born 1602; died 1678. Chinese military leader.

Wu San-kuei commanded the troops of the Ming Dynasty that defended Shanhaikuan against the Manchus. In 1644, after a rebel army of peasants under Li Tzu-ch’eng took Peking, Wu San-kuei went over to the Manchus and helped them suppress the uprising known as the Peasant War of 1628–45. The Manchu court appointed him vicegerent of Yunnan. When it became apparent that the Manchu authorities intended to abolish the vicegerencies in South and Southwest China, he initiated in 1673 a rebellion that encompassed several southern and southwestern provinces. The rebellion was crushed after his death in 1681. In China, Wu San-kuei’s name has become a synonym for treachery.

References in periodicals archive ?
Fellow Miao commanders, Wu Tianban and Wu Bayue, additionally took the title of "Wu King"--claiming to be a transmigration (zhuanshi [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]) of the famed anti-Manchu Han Chinese general Wu Sangui [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (1612-78).
(36) Heshen repeated this rhetoric, concluding with the final bureaucratic verdict that the Miao kings, like Wu Sangui, had performed "the most grievous crimes to the vilest degree" (zui da eji [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]).
Wu Sangui, as a contender to Qing rule, had control over Hunan and Guizhou for several years in the late 1670s, the memory of which lingered.
The leader of this revolt, Wu Sangui, was a nephew of Zu Dashou--the man buried in the ROM's large Chinese tomb.
In 1678, Wu Sangui proclaimed himself emperor shortly before his death and the ensuing collapse of his rebel empire.
In addition, Di Cosmo supplements the text with an introduction--a brief analysis of the conquest, Wu Sangui as a historical character, the rebellion of the Three Feudatories, and text authorship, style, and narrative--in addition to notes, which explain technical terms and geographical issues, and give information about people.