Wuppertal


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Wuppertal

(vo͝op`ərtäl), city (1994 pop. 386,625), North Rhine–Westphalia, W Germany, on the Wupper River. It is an industrial center, formed in 1929 by the merger of Barmen, Elberfeld, Vohwinkel, and several smaller towns. Manufactures include textiles, machinery, tools, chemicals, rubber, vehicles, printing equipment, and beer. Barmen was first mentioned in the 11th cent. and Elberfeld in the 12th cent. Elberfeld pioneered in legislation for poor relief with a system that it adopted in the mid-19th cent. and that was widely imitated (see poor lawpoor law,
in English history, legislation relating to public assistance for the poor. Early measures to relieve pauperism were usually designed to suppress vagrancy and begging.
..... Click the link for more information.
). As a major production center of ball bearings and chemicals in World War II, the city was heavily damaged by Allied bombing raids. Of note are the city hall (1912–22) and the opera house (1956) as well as the suspended electric railway (opened 1901). There is a museum of the history of clocks and watches.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Wuppertal

 

a city in the Federal Republic of Germany, located in the Land (state) of North Rhine-Westphalia, on the Wupper River (Rhine basin). Population, 413,000 (1969).

Wuppertal came into being in 1929 as a result of a merger of several cities, including Barmen (the birthplace of F. Engels) and Elberfeld. It is an important transportation junction as well as a significant industrial and commercial center of the Ruhr. Wuppertal is a major center of the textile industry and manufactures textile machinery, chemicals, and Pharmaceuticals. It produces rolled iron and electronic equipment. Wuppertal has administrative, economic, pedagogical, and technical academies. The city also has a conservatory and an opera theater.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Wuppertal

a city in W Germany, in North Rhine-Westphalia state on the Wupper River (a Rhine tributary): formed in 1929 from the amalgamation of the towns of Barmen and Elberfeld and other smaller towns; textile centre. Pop.: 362 137 (2003 est.)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
"Wuppertal has now become the center of waterborne production for Axalta's Europe, Middle East and Africa region.
At the ceremony to mark the event--attended by Wuppertal's mayor, Peter Jung, media and Axalta employees--Axalta Chairman and CEO Charlie Shaver underscored the company's commitment to the production of environmentally responsible waterborne paint technologies.
The Green Route Club was set up in 1997 to promote cycle friendship exchanges between South Shields and Wuppertal - a link which marked its 60th anniversary last year.
They would be happy to reciprocate the generosity of the North East family by hosting their own children in Wuppertal.
Tanztheater Wuppertal Pina Bausch brought to Brooklyn's Next Wave Festival the New York premiere of one of her more recent full-evening pieces, Masurca Fogo (Fiery Mazurka).
The investment will reinforce the Wuppertal site, already the largest of Axalta's 35 manufacturing facilities around the world, and Germany as the centre of Axalta's water-based paint manufacturing operations in its Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA) region.
German postmodern dance history ran in reverse at the opening of the Cal Performances season when a program by thirty-two-year-old Berlin-based choreographer Sasha Waltz and her company was followed by fifty-nine-year-old Pina Bausch and her Tanztheater Wuppertal. It was splendid to have the opportunity to see the two artists close together.
She has also created a site-inspired work based on her experiences in Lisbon (Viktor, 1986), Madrid (Tanzabend II, which had actually premiered six months earlier in 1991 in Wuppertal), Palermo (Palermo, Palermo; 1989), and Vienna (Ein Trauerspiel ("A Mourning Play," 1994).