Wutai Shan

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Related to Wutaishan: Wutai Mountain

Wutai Shan

(wo͞o-tī shän), mountain range, extending c.150 mi (240 km) across NE Shanxi and NW Hebei prov., NE China. The mountains, rising to c.10,035 ft (3,058 m), are sacred to Buddhists and contain monasteries frequented by pilgrims.

Wut’ai Shan

 

a mountain range in East China, in Shansi Province. The range is approximately 170 km long, and the maximum elevation is 2,894 m. Wut’ai Shan is composed primarily of sedimentary limestones and sandstones and igneous rocks. The tops of its peaks are flat, and the slopes are steep. The broad-leaved and pine forests of the range have been almost entirely cleared away. There are numerous Buddhist monasteries on the summits of Wut’ai Shan.

References in periodicals archive ?
Most stations exhibited increasing trends, with the lowest winter slope of 0.01[degrees]C/decade (Hequ station) and the highest winter slope of 1.51[degrees]C/decade (Wutaishan station) being located in SR-I and SR-III, respectively.
A strong increasing trend was observed at the Wutaishan station and a significant negative trend was only found at the Chengde station, both stations being located in SR-III (Figure 5(f)).
A strong decreasing trend was observed at the Wutaishan station in SR-III and a weak positive trend was identified at the Sonid Left station (SR-II; Figure 9(a)).
The Wutaishan station in SR-III recorded the strongest decreasing trend in the BTSSR (Figure 9(b)).
A strong increasing trend was observed at the Wutaishan station (SR-III) and a significant negative trend was identified at the Hequ station (SR-I; Figure 9(d)).
Significant decreasing trends (at the 99% confidence level) were identified at the Hequ and Chengde stations (Figure 10(a)), accounting for 3.77% of the total stations, and a strong increasing trend was observed at the Wutaishan station (SR-III).
Twenty-nine stations recorded significant increases (54.72% of the total stations), with the Wutaishan station in SR-III recording the strongest increasing trend, and only one station recorded a decrease (Table 2; Figure 10(b)).
The strongest increasing trend was observed at the Wutaishan station in SR-III (Figure 10(c)).
The strongest increasing trend was recorded at the Wutaishan station (SR-III; Figure 10(d)).
Author Isabelle Charleux presents students, academics, and researchers with an examination of the late imperial and Republican period Mongol pilgrimages to Wutaishan. The author has organized the main body of her text in seven chapters devoted to an overview of the pilgrimage sites of the Mongols, the invention of Wutaishan, the political and clerical promotion of Wutaishan in the Qing and Republican periods, and a wide variety of other related subjects.
She covers the music of Manjusri's Mountain, music in ritual at Wutaishan, Wutaisan's shengguan music, and Buddhist music in a material world.
Bai, "The Precambrian crustal evolution of the Wutaishan area," in The Early Precambrian Geology of Wutaishan, J.