Wynkyn de Worde


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Worde, Wynkyn de:

see Wynkyn de WordeWynkyn de Worde
, d. 1535, English printer, whose original name was Jan van Wynkyn. He was born at Wörth in Alsace and probably accompanied William Caxton to England in 1476. He assisted in the work of Caxton at Westminster and after Caxton's death took over his business.
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Wynkyn de Worde

(wĭng`kĭn də wôrd, wûrd), d. 1535, English printer, whose original name was Jan van Wynkyn. He was born at Wörth in Alsace and probably accompanied William CaxtonCaxton, William,
c.1421–91, English printer, the first to print books in English. He served apprenticeship as a mercer and from 1463 to 1469 was at Bruges as governor of the Merchants Adventurers in the Low Countries, serving as a diplomat for the English king.
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 to England in 1476. He assisted in the work of Caxton at Westminster and after Caxton's death took over his business. His independent work began in 1491 and continued until his death. At first he used only typefaces that Caxton had used, but to these he later added other styles. Wynkyn de Worde printed more than 700 books, including the first English example of music printed from moving type, Higden's Polychronicon (1495).
References in periodicals archive ?
This was followed by similar statements by others such as Wynkyn de Worde in Orchard of Syon (1519), who emphasized spiritual common profits, which of course could be effectively promulgated through the dissemination of books.
Martha Driver shows, for example, that van Doesborch's contemporary Wynkyn de Worde applied a comparable scheme.
The thoroughfare became synonymous with publishing from 1500 when Wynkyn de Worde established a printing press.
Late medieval carving manuals, such as The Boke of Keruynge printed by Wynkyn de Worde, make clear that the carver is not merely a lowly servant, but someone within the patronage network of a greater personage, serving in the household and presumably scraping from their trencher afterwards for sustenance.
Wynkyn de Worde, the printer of the edition published in 1528, merits special attention for his efforts at the regularisation of spelling.
Note, however, that Valentine and Orson was published by Wynkyn de Worde not in 1502, as Rogers states (63), but ca.
First attested in 1483, the term is used by Wynkyn de Worde ten years later to describe how: 'In worshyppe of saynte Johan the people waked at home, & made iij maner of fyres.
The list of great rarities includes the best-preserved 11th Century service book produced in the aftermath of the Norman Conquest; the manuscript of the works of Lawrence, prior of Durham from 1149-54; one of only four surviving copies of a book by William Caxton; a unique copy of Thomas More's first assault on Martin Luther; and four items from the workshop of the aptlynamed printer Wynkyn de Worde.
Chapter 3, "Wynkyn de Worde and the Title Page," represents the author's most significant contribution to current scholarship: her knowledge of Wynkyn de Worde's printing practices and shop appears particularly far-reaching.
After Wynkyn de Worde had inherited William Caxton's workshop in Westminster, he soon found that its location was not favourable with respect to business.