X-ray telescope


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Related to X-ray telescope: ultraviolet telescope

X-ray telescope

An instrument carried above the Earth's atmosphere by an X-ray satellite, etc., and by means of which X-rays from space can be detected and recorded. See also CCD; grazing incidence; microchannel plate detector; proportional counter.

x-ray telescope

[′eks ‚rā ′tel·ə‚skōp]
(engineering)
An instrument designed to detect x-rays emanating from a source outside the earth's atmosphere and to resolve the x-rays into an image; they are carried to high altitudes by balloons, rockets, or space vehicles; although several types of x-ray detector, involving gas counters, scintillation counters, and collimators, have been used, only one, making use of the phenomenon of total external reflection of x-rays from a surface at grazing incidence, is strictly an x-ray telescope.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hinode's X-ray telescope can record emissions that range between about 1 million and 4 million kelvins (273.15 kelvins equals 0[degrees]C or 32[degrees]F).
Rosat, which collects "soft" (low-energy) X-rays, produces images sharper than those from any previous X-ray telescope. But it does not distinguish the energies of these X-rays very well.
Tom Allen, a scientist at Optical Coating Laboratories (OCLI), Santa Rosa, Calif., uses VASE to characterize the metal film deposited on the reflective surfaces of an x-ray telescope OCLI is building for NASA.
Europe's XMM-Newton, a completely independent x-ray telescope, also confirmed the line.
George Lansbury (University of Durham, UK) and colleagues have now used NASA's NuSTAR X-ray telescope to study nine suspected veiled quasars, detecting five of them.
In less than two years' time a new powerful X-ray telescope eROSITA, which is currently being built at MPE, will be put into orbit on the Russian-German SRG satellite.
Researchers from the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology (KIPAC), jointly run by Stanford University and the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, shed light on this important era by analyzing 84 sets of X-ray telescope observations from the Japanese-US Suzaku satellite.
British scientists have played a key role in two of its key instruments, the X-ray telescope and the UV/optical telescope.
He waited until the last possible moment before radioing Collins and her crew and telling them they would not be able to lift off with the world's most powerful X-ray telescope.