x-ray burster

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x-ray burster

[′eks ‚rā ′bər·stər]
(astronomy)
One of a class of celestial x-ray sources which produce bursts of x-rays in the 1-20-kiloelectronvolt range and which are characterized by rise times of less than a few seconds and decay times of a few seconds to a few minutes; the peak luminosity is of the order of 1038 ergs per second (1031 watts) and the sources have an average equivalent temperature of 108K.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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(Similar bands, the Van Allen radiation belts, surround Earth.) The disturbance could have caused a substantial number of the particles to leak into the planet's northern hemisphere, creating the X-ray burst and auroral arcs, he says.
These images show that twin, high-intensity X-ray bursts appear simultaneously at the two footpoints of a magnetic loop - the anchor points where magnetic fields leave the hot corona and enter the dense chromosphere.
"Whether or not arsenic-65 exists affects how much energy you get out in an X-ray burst ...
X-ray bursts apparently occur when sufficient material collects on a neutron star's surface to initiate a runaway thermonuclear reaction.
Richard Schwartz, also of ST Systems, notes that between March 6 and 19 -- the time required for the active region to cross the sun -- the satellite's Hard X-Ray Burst Spectrometer recorded 447 hard X-ray flares, a rate of about 32 per day.
The researchers studied the 152-day periodicity of 442 major flares recorded from February 1980 to December 1983 by the Hard X-Ray Burst Spectrometer, one of several devices on board the Solar Maximum Mission that began studying the sun in 1980 (SN: 9/6/80, p.152).
But when black holes mate with a low mass star, the marriage emits X-ray bursts that are weaker, but consistent and detectable.
And in the intense, neutron-rich environment, nuclear reactions cause strong explosions that manifest themselves as X-ray bursts and the X-ray superbursts that are more rare and 1 ,000 times more powerful.
Accordingly, Hix collaborates on projects over a wide range of astrophysical phenomena, including novae, supernovae, x-ray bursts, and gamma-ray bursts, looking at their elemental and isotopic contributions to the galaxy as well as the rest of their interesting behaviors.
In early January, 1996, a second satellite, the X-ray Timing Explorer, detected X-ray bursts coincident with the BATSE observations.
Follow-up observations from the Hubble Space Telescope confirmed these were not active galaxies--the central black hole had been truly dormant before the mysterious X-ray bursts appeared.
They are studying the brief flashes of radiation known as X-ray bursts. These are emitted hours to days after matter from a companion strikes the neutron star's surface.