X-ray nova

X-ray nova

See X-ray transients.

x-ray nova

[′eks ‚rā ′nō·və]
(astronomy)
An x-ray source which appears suddenly in the sky, dramatically increases in intensity over a few days, and then decays away with a lifetime of several months. Also known as transient x-ray source.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The fact that GRB 130427A was intrinsically powerful and occurred in neighborhood and yet had properties common to ordinary GRBs at larger distances suggests that they have common 'engines.'" Previous MAXI findings include the 2010 X-ray nova discovery that emerged in the constellation of Ophiuchus.
The outburst, produced by a rare X-ray nova, announced the presence of a new black hole.
An X-ray nova is a short-lived X-ray source that appears suddenly, reaches its emission peak in a few days and then fades out over a period of months.
An X-ray nova is a short-lived X-ray source that emerges suddenly and reaches it emission peak in few days and then fades away over a period of months.
Our next target was the X-ray nova XTE J1118+480, now known as KV Ursae Majoris.
Narayan's team used the Japanese X-ray satellite ASCA to observe V404 Cygni, an X-ray nova known to contain a black hole (SN: 2/15/92, p.
Ramesh Narayan and his colleagues at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass., examined a group of objects, called X-ray novas, that consist of a visible star locked in the gravitational embrace of an unseen companion.
The outburst, produced by a rare X-ray nova, announced the presence of a previously unknown stellar-mass black hole.
A rising tide of high-energy X-rays was recently detected by NASA's Swift satellite from a source toward the center of our Milky Way galaxy, and according to the space agency, that outburst produced by the rare X-ray nova announced the presence of a stellar-mass black hole that had remained unknown until now.
Known as GRO J1655-40, this X-ray nova ranked as one of the three brightest X-ray sources in the sky for 2 weeks.
Della Valle and Jarvis say these observations suggest that the new identified object represents an unusual type of exploding star called an X-ray nova, which radiates more X-rays than optical light and has been detected only four times before.
The list of probable stellar-mass black holes has grown again with the discovery of a dense, massive object in the X-ray Nova Muscae 1991.