XML


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XML

(communications)

XML

XML

(EXtensible Markup Language) The most widely used semi-structured format for data, introduced by the W3C in 1998. XML files contain only tags and text similar to HTML. However, whereas HTML defines how elements are displayed and printed, XML assigns meaning to the elements. HTML uses predefined tags, but XML requires the developer of the content to define most of the tags. Thus, just like database records, virtually any data items, such as "product," "sales rep" and "amount due," can be specified.

By providing a common method for identifying data, XML supports business-to-business transactions and has become "the" format for electronic data interchange and Web services.

XML Is Only a Format
When introduced, XML was hyped as the panacea for e-commerce, but it was only a first step. The human-readable XML tags provide a simple format, but the intelligent defining of these tags to serve business needs properly and everyone's compliance in using the same tags determine XML's real value. Countless vocabularies have been developed for vertical applications; so many in fact, that a universal language was developed to provide a standard for interoperability between them (see UBL). See XML vocabulary, Web services, SOA and EDI).

XML Documents Can Define Themselves
An XML document can include a self-describing set of rules that identify the tags and their relationships; for example, only one XYZ tag is allowed within an ABC tag, or there must be one XYZ tag within every ABC tag and so forth. See XML schema.

More Rigid than HTML
Unlike HTML, which uses a rather loose coding style and is more tolerant of coding errors, XML pages have to be "well formed" and comply with the rules. See XSLT, DTD, DOM, XHTML, JSON, HTML, SGML, SMIL and XML-RPC.


XML vs. HTML Tags
Although similar, XML tags define data, whereas HTML tags define the page layout (in this example, font size and a bold date). All elements are wrapped within "start" and "end" tags, also called "open" and "close" tags. The tags themselves begin with a less-than (<) character and end with a greater-than (>) character. All end tags begin with less-than-slash (</).
References in periodicals archive ?
span xml:lang="ENWazito, the new kids on the block, have also reinforced their squad greatly, bringing in experienced players like Eric "Cantona" Ochieng, Burundian defender Karim Nizigiyimana and Ugandan prodigy Mansoor Agu.
Since XML is a technology term, it makes sense to choose an online resource that's devoted to technology, and I chose Webopedia, part of internet.com from INT Media Group, Inc.
In Section 2, we describe how to calculate invariant and variable statistics for scoring XML fragments in XML search engines.
The approach with such XML-friendly relational products is to split up the XML documents into their constituent elements and assign these to relational tables.
"By concentrating our efforts exclusively on the XML database, we can bring to market the more specialized features that XML and Java professionals look for when evaluating native XML databases," said Van Rotterdam.
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* Using the XML abstraction without specifying a file name and wait for after populating the XML contents to attempt to save the XML file on disk using a file name specified during this step.
"Our relationship with Microsoft continues to allow us to bring superior XML authoring solutions to organizations across a range of industries so they can improve and automate their publishing processes," said John Friske, General Manager of XML products for Quark.
However, ODF leverages richer XML standards for graphics and forms, an option unavailable to Microsoft since compatibility with earlier office products was essential.
The book is written for intermediate to advanced Java developers who need to use XML, including developers involved in the new peer-to-peer movement, messaging, or web services, or those involved with developing software for electronic commerce.
* A technical Specification, currently version 2.1, that defines how to use XML standards from the World Wide Web Consortium (5) to create agreed-upon business reporting languages (taxonomies) and how to express business data using those languages (instance documents); in other words, XML optimized for business reporting.
Most survey respondents (70 percent) said they process XML and store it as data in a relational database.