Xanthias

Xanthias

carries Bacchus’s heavy bundles. [Gk. Lit.: The Frogs]
See: Servant
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
And that you may not suppose the incompetent teachers to be only the meaner sort of Athenians and few in number, remember again that Thucydides had two sons, Melesias and Stephanus, whom, besides giving them a good education in other things, he trained in wrestling, and they were the best wrestlers in Athens: one of them he committed to the care of Xanthias, and the other of Eudorus, who had the reputation of being the most celebrated wrestlers of that day.
The audience clearly witness Strepsiades and Xanthias setting about this on the skene roof (even if not to the extent of literally setting the skene on fire), as students flee the scene:
203-04); even Xanthias, the slave, refuses to fight, wasting his chance for freedom (ll.
The play begins with Xanthias (Derek Lucci) and his master, Dionysus (Pedro Pascal), wondering how to solve their country's problems.
Here, musical gods Nathan Lane and Brian Stokes Mitchell give spirited performances as Dionysius and Xanthias, while longtime Sondheim orchestrator Jonathan Tunick serves up a playful choral majesty.
Similarly, at Frogs 549-78, `four actors are required to play Dionysos, Xanthias, the Innkeeper, and Plathane' (MacDowell, 334).
Dionysos demands that Xanthias swear three times by Zeus that the monster Empousa has really gone away.
Knowing that Heracles has already been there, he borrows his famous lion skin as a disguise and sets off with his slave Xanthias.
In act 1, scene 1, in lines added by Lane, Dionysus tells Xanthias his reasons for traveling to Hades: "The Peloponnesian War still rages on, Xanthias.
Dionysos Nathan Lane Xanthias Roger Raft Herakles Burke Moses Charon, Aeakos John Byner Pluto Peter Bartlett George Bernard Shaw Daniel Davis William Shakespeare Michael Siberry
Besides Philokleon, Bdelykleon, and Xanthias there is a Boy who arrives with the chorus at 230 and departs with the other (non-speaking) boys at 414.
Empousa is a shapeshifter and part of Hecate's entourage, a chthonic dweller, the child-eating monster who frightens Xanthias and Dionysus in Aristophanes' Frogs (285-96):