Xanthorrhoea


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Xanthorrhoea

 

a genus of monocotyledonous plants of the family Xanthorrhoeceae (formerly considered to be in the family Liliaceae). There are 11 or 12 xerophilous species, growing primarily on dry Australian savannas. The plants are arborescent, sometimes slightly branched, with a rosette (or rosettes) of leaves on the top. The leaves, which are large, brittle, and linear, reach a length of 1 m. As a result of their form of growth, these plants are classified among the “grass trees.” Some species of Xanthorrhoea yield a resin that is used for making varnishes.

References in periodicals archive ?
Other plants included species of Bambusa, Blechnum, Calamus, Durvillaea, Dianella, Dioscorea, Oryza, Pteridium, Phragmites, Scirpus, Triodia, Typha and Xanthorrhoea.
Dominant species include Messmate Eucalyptus obliqua, Brown Stringybark Eucalyptus baxteri, Austral Grass Tree Xanthorrhoea australis, Silver Banksia Banksia marginata, Prickly Tea-tree Leptospermum continentale, Heath Tea-tree Leptospermum myrsinoides, Common Flat-pea Platylobium obtusangulum, Scrub She-oak Allocasuarina paludosa, Thatch Saw-sedge Gahnia radula, Austral Bracken Pteridium esculentum and Common Rapier-sedge Lepidosperma filiforme.
The native plants for which Considen documented medicinal actions include myrtle (possibly Eugenia australis) and yellow gum (possibly Xanthorrhoea hastilis) for dysentery, and native sarsaparilla (Smilax glycyphylla) as an antiscorbutic.
The Small Grass Tree Xanthorrhoea minor--in common with other grass trees--is a slow-growing plant that has a subterranean stem.
cons.--Type: Xanthorrhoea Sm., 1798.--Validated by a diagnosis in French in a key.
sieberi and Saw Banksia Banksia serrata) on ridges, and Wet Heathland (dominated by Grass-tree Xanthorrhoea resinosa, Scented Paperbark Melaleuca squarrosa and Scrub Sheoak Allocasuarina paludosa) typically restricted to swales between coastal dunes.
30 Dec 1999.--Type: Xanthorrhoea Sm.; Xanthorrhoeaceae Dumort., 1829.
(2011) observed that some insects and other invertebrates survived in experimentally burnt grass trees Xanthorrhoea preissii (Xanthorrhoeaceae) in Western Australia.
Acaroid or grass-tree Xanthorrhoea hastilis, Liliaceae