Xenocrates

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Xenocrates

(zĭnŏk`rətēz), 396–314 B.C., Greek philosopher, b. Chalcedon, successor of Speusippus as head of the AcademyAcademy,
school founded by Plato near Athens c.387 B.C. It took its name from the garden (named for the hero Academus) in which it was located. Plato's followers met there for nine centuries until, along with other pagan schools, it was closed by Emperor Justinian in A.D. 529.
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. He was a disciple of Plato, whom he accompanied to Sicily in 361 B.C. His ascetic life and noble character greatly influenced his pupils. He was the first to divide philosophy into dialectic (or logic), physics, and ethics, the latter two being his principal themes. He held that mathematical objects and the Platonic Ideas are both substances, and both identical, causing Aristotle to say of him that he "made ideal and mathematical number the same." His Platonic ethics taught that virtue produces happiness, although external goods can contribute. Only fragments of his work survive.

Xenocrates

temperate philosopher, noted for contempt of wealth. [Gk. Hist.: Brewer Dictionary, 1169]

Xenocrates

?396--314 bc, Greek Platonic philosopher
References in periodicals archive ?
xenocrates se dispone mas estilizada y esbelta, con el uncus mas largo y delgado, la constriccion dorsoventral en su base es menos evidente que la especie anterior.
The evidence is frustratingly scanty, but it seems that Xenocrates and Polemo, respectively the second and third heads of the Academy after Plato, played a crucial role in passing this reading on to Zeno of Citium, the founder of the Stoa.
25) Others specifically named by Cicero are Epicurus, the Scythian Anacharsis and Xenocrates, the peripatetic contemporary of Diogenes.
There is some evidence that Speusippus and Xenocrates, Plato's successors at the Academy, viewed Plato's account of the demiurge as standing in a causal, rather than temporal, relation to the cosmos, i.
13) Later biographical sources, although not always trustworthy, suggest numerous teacher-student relationships of a pederastic nature: the philosophers Parmenides and Zeno, Xenocrates and Polemon, Polemon and Crates, Crantor and Arcesilaus, the sculptors Pheidias and Agoracritus of Paros, the physician Theomedon and Eudoxus of Cnidus.
A reference, in part, to Aristotle, who for three years lived and taught in Assos with Erastus and Xenocrates.
67) It is rather the first four academies who interpret Plato more correctly, and of these, it is the academies of Xenocrates and Ammonius, the first and the fourth, who have done the best job:
Sin embargo, a pesar de las frecuentes muestras de afecto y deferencia del estagirita, Platon nunca perdono a Aristoteles que senalara la incomprobable existencia de sus ideas y dejo dispuesto que al morir no fuera el aventajado alumno, antagonista feroz, quien heredase la direccion de la Academia y en cambio la confio a un tal Xenocrates, absolutamente adicto al maestro.
186b, 464c, 496f), and Xenocrates (another pupil of Plato) also wrote a treatise on symposium manners (Ath.
These are Chiron, Machaon, Pamphilus, Xenocrates, Sextius Niger, Heraclides, and Mantias on the first picture, and Galen, Crateuas, Apollonius, Andreas, Dioscurides, Nicander, and Rufus on the second.
Aristotle, Xenocrates, Dioscorides and Theophrastus are among the Greeks who influenced this genre of Arabic literature.