Jerez de la Frontera

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Jerez de la Frontera

(hārāth dā lä frōntā`rä), city (1990 pop. 186,812), Cádiz prov., SW Spain, in Andalusia. Jerez is an important commercial center noted for its sherry and brandy. Its horses of mixed Spanish, Arab, and English blood are world famous. Captured by the Moors in 711, the city was recovered by Alfonso X of Castile in 1264. Of interest are its Gothic churches and an 11th-century Arab alcazar.

Jerez de la Frontera

 

a city in southern Spain, in the region of Andalusia, in Cádiz Province, on the Guadalete River. Population, 149,800 (1970). Jerez de la Frontera is a railroad junction. An important wine-making center, it is known for its sherry. The city’s other industries include locomotive repair, cork processing, the canning of fruit products, and the manufacture of textiles, bottles, and wine barrels. Jerez de la Frontera is the center of a horse-raising region.

References in periodicals archive ?
The last stage was won by Fahad Al Khatri who completed the stage in a total time of 40:16 minutes, followed by Raed Mahmood riding his horse Xeres in a total time of 41:51 minutes, while Mohammed Al Khatri completed the course in a total time of 48:11 minutes.
CHENAUX, Ph., <<Il Vaticano II tra storia e teologia: status quaestionis>>, Revista Espanola de Teologia 72 (2012) 449-468, aqui 450; XERES, S., <<La storiografia sul Vaticano II.
4 1/2 teaspoons olive oil 1/2ounce superfine sugar 4 Roma tomatoes, halved Tomato water, from above 3/4 teaspoon Xeres vinegar Fleur de set and freshly ground black pepper to taste For the pesto:
Since it started Australia's biggest offshore exploration campaign, Woodside has already made nine discoveries including Xeres. Woodside has already made an attempt to fortify a second train and most analysts say that sufficient gas has now been discovered to push through with the second train.
Battle to stave off Xeres and his tyrannical Persian army in this retelling of the ancient Battle of Thermopylae.
Pizarro's companions Francisco de Xeres and Miguel de Estete both mention it in their chronicles.
enough in it to keep the army of Xeres for a month, and feathers enough
My gratitude is also due to Don Saverio Xeres, the exceptionally helpful diocesan archivist of Como; to Signora Ezia Noseda of the Comune di Brunate; to Professor Alexander Patschovsky for generously sharing his unpublished work on the Guglielmites; and to Richard Kieckhefer for his fine photography and for insisting on the importance of obscure mountain churches.