Xerxes


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Xerxes

 

(Greek form of the Old Persian Khshayarsha). Died 465 B.C. Ancient Persian king from 486 to 465 B.C., of the Achaemenid dynasty. Son of Darius I.

Xerxes suppressed a rebellion in Egypt (486–84). After a revolt broke out among the Babylonians in 482, he destroyed Babylon and made the Babylonian kingdom a Persian satrapy. In 480 he launched a campaign against Greece, which ended in the defeat of the Persian fleet at Salamis (480) and Mycale (479) and of the Persian Army at Plataea (479). Attempting to arrest the decline of Achaemenid power after these failures in the Greco-Persian Wars, Xerxes introduced a religious reform. The reform amounted to a ban on the worship of local clan deities and a strengthening of the cult of the general Iranian god Ahura Mazda. Xerxes was killed as a result of a palace conspiracy.

REFERENCE

Strove, V. V. “Nadpis’ Kcerksa o ‘devakh’ i religiia persov.” Izv. AN SSSR. Seriia istorii i filosofii, 1944, no. 3.

Xerxes

constructed famed pontoon crossing of Hellespont. [Gk. Hist.: Brewer Dictionary, 1169]
See: Bridge
References in classic literature ?
Instead of this obvious policy, Athens and Sparta, inflated with the victories and the glory they had acquired, became first rivals and then enemies; and did each other infinitely more mischief than they had suffered from Xerxes. Their mutual jealousies, fears, hatreds, and injuries ended in the celebrated Peloponnesian war; which itself ended in the ruin and slavery of the Athenians who had begun it.
"It was the fruiterer," replied my friend, "who brought you to the conclusion that the mender of soles was not of sufficient height for Xerxes et id genus omne."
So, if great things to small may be compar'd, XERXES, the Libertie of GREECE to yoke, From SUSA his MEMNONIAN Palace high Came to the Sea, and over HELLESPONT Bridging his way, EUROPE with ASIA joyn'd, And scourg'd with many a stroak th' indignant waves.
Pretension never wrote an Iliad, nor drove back Xerxes, nor christianized the world, nor abolished slavery.
Incensed that Haman was plotting against his queen within the very walls of the palace, King Xerxes had Haman executed on the gallows that he had prepared for Mordecai (7:7-10).
After attributing the defeat of Persia to both Greek independence and bravery and to the gods' punishment of Persian folly for going outside the bounds of Asia, the play ends with the return of the broken and humiliated Persian king, Xerxes.
After his death in 485 bc, his successor, Xerxes, spent three years preparing for the second Persian War.
Rating 300: RISE OF AN EMPIRE (15) COURAGEOUS Greek general Themistocles (Sullivan Stapleton) fires the arrow that slays Persian King Darius (Igal Naor) in front of his son, Prince Xerxes (Rodrigo Santoro).
And while there's no Gerard Butler bellowing: "This is Sparta," both Lena Headey (Sparta's Queen Gorgo) and Rodrigo Santoro (King Xerxes) are back.
It tells the story of the Battle of Thermopylae in 480 BC, when Persians were under the rule of King Xerxes, who had sent his army to conquer Greece.
The authorities identified those injured as Marife David, who sustained first-degree burns on the left arm; Cuadra Xerxes, who had first-degree burns on the back and 2nd-degree burns on the right foot; and Antonio Arateo, who was injured on both arms.