Xerxes I


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Xerxes I

Xerxes I (Xerxes the Great) (zûrkˈsēz), d. 465 B.C., king of ancient Persia (486–465 B.C.). His name in Old Persian is Khshayarsha, in the Bible Ahasuerus. He was the son of Darius I and Atossa, daughter of Cyrus the Great. After bringing (484 BC.) Egypt once more under Persian rule, Xerxes prepared for an invasion of Greece (see Persian Wars) by constructing a bridge of boats across the Hellespont and cutting a canal through the isthmus of Athos. Setting out from Sardis, he marched through Thrace and Macedonia and, despite the bravery of Leonidas and his 300 Spartans, overthrew (480) the Lacedaemonians at Thermopylae. He then occupied and pillaged Athens. In the same year his fleet was destroyed at Salamis. Leaving an army under his general, Mardonius, he retired into Asia. He was slain by the captain of his bodyguard and was succeeded by his son Artaxerxes I.

Bibliography

See P. Green, Xerxes at Salamis (1970).

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Xerxes I

?519--465 bc, king of Persia (485--465), who led a vast army against Greece. His forces were victorious at Thermopylae but his fleet was defeated at Salamis (480) and his army at Plataea (479)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Xerxes is at first especially angry with Artabanus' opposition but later reconsiders and decides to call the expedition off.
Furthermore, Xerxes, as a Persian, is not a character whom the audience would identi as an undeserving victim or like themselves -- Xerxes is, after all, the former enemy of the Greeks and a man whom his father's ghost explicitly criticizes in the play for impiety and excess.
Then this same first actor as the ghost of Darius is dressed in the finery appropriate to a king of the Persians, and says that Xerxes is fully guilty of overbearing pride, predicts future disaster, and says that Xerxes will return home in rags.