Sian Incident

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Sian Incident

 

in December 1936, the arrest of Chiang Kai-shek, the head of China’s Nanking government, by a group of Kuomintang officers led by the commander of the Northeastern Army Chang Hsüeh-liang and the commander of the 17th Army Yang Hu-ch’eng.

On Dec. 12, 1936, the officers arrested Chiang Kai-shek and his entourage after the latter’s arrival in Sian, the capital of Shensi Province. The incident greatly complicated the situation in China, creating the threat of a wider civil war and of China’s dismemberment at the hands of the Japanese. Immediately after the arrest of Chiang Kai-shek, Mao Tse-tung and his supporters attempted to impose on the leadership of the Communist Party of China (CPC) a policy of support for Chang Hsüeh-liang and Yang Hu-ch’eng. On the recommendation of the Executive Committee of the Communist International, however, the CPC leaders took part in negotiations with the arrested Chiang Kai-shek—who was freed on December 25—in order to settle the conflict peaceably. A peaceful settlement of the Sian incident was a prerequisite for the establishment of a united anti-Japanese national front in China in 1937.

REFERENCES

“Sobytiia ν Kitae.” Pravda, Dec. 14, 1936.
Grigor’ev, A. M., and A. B. Reznikov. “G. Dimitrov i problema edi-nogo antiimperialisticheskogo fronta.” In Georgii Dimitrov —vvdaiushchiisia deiatel’ kommunisticheskogo dvizheniia. Moscow. 1972.
Noveishaia Istoriia Kitaia. Moscow, 1972. Pages 166–69.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Marshal Zhang Xueliang's half-century-long house imprisonment by the Chiangs as a revenge for the Xi'an Incident of 1936 was merely "a boring (but not unpleasant) experience" (p.
But Chiang never forgave the Young Marshal for his perceived betrayal, stripped him of all his posts and put him under house arrest for what became known as the Xi'an Incident that made him a national hero in the eyes of the Communists.
When two of Chiang Kai-shek's warlord allies captured the Guomindang leader in December 1936, Smedley was there to tell the world about the dramatic events of the Xi'an Incident, which eventually produced a civil war truce and the second Guomindang-Communist united front, the political framework for Chinese resistance to Japan's advancing armies.
Chiang stripped Chang of all his posts and put him under house arrest for what has become known as the Xi'an incident and made him a national hero in the eyes of the Communists.
After Chiang was released, Chang was put under house arrest for what has become known as the Xi'an incident, making him a national hero in the eyes of the Communists.