Hsiang Chiang

(redirected from Xiang River)
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Hsiang Chiang

 

a river in China. The Hsiang Chiang measures 801 km in length and drains an area of 94,900 sq km. It originates in the Nan Ling Mountains and flows predominantly northeast over a hilly plain, emptying into Tungt’ing Hu, a lake of the Yangtze River basin. The Hsiang Chiang is fed by rain. High water is in summer, and low water is in winter. The water level varies by as much as 12.8 m. The mean flow rate in the lower course, near the city of Hsiangt’an, is 2,270 cu m per sec. The river is navigable for ships as far as the city of Hsiangt’an, and for junks as far upstream as the city of Henyang. The river’s waters are used for irrigation. The city of Ch’angsha is situated on the Hsiang Chiang.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The 354-room hotel crowns a 61-story tower on prestigious Xiangjiang Road, offering breathtaking views of Xiang River and the city skyline.
The significance of this waterway cannot be understated as it connected the upper course of the Li with the Xiang River, which flowed north into the Yangtze--the Middle Kingdom's longest waterway, often used to distinguish north from south China.
Chen and other villagers believed that wastewater discharged from the factory had poisoned the Xiang River, a source for drinking water and irrigation, and that the dark smoke rising from the plant's chimney had fouled the air.
Huang Li swam like a dolphin, sometimes paddling with her bound hands, for more than a mile in the Xiang River on Tuesday, travelling with the current, her father said.
Something of a coup de theatre surfaces when Wang Chiang-mei as the Goddess of the Xiang River dominates the stage trailing a seemingly endless white veil, manipulated and arranged at one point like Robert Smithson's postmodern earth work called Spiral Jetty.