Hsüan Tsang

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Hsüan Tsang

 

Born circa 600; died 664. Chinese traveler. Buddhist monk.

From 629 to 645, Hsüan Tsang traveled in Middle and Central Asia and India. In his work Ta T’ang hsi yü chi (Notes on the Countries of the West), concluded in 648, he provided much information on the geography, ethnography, and history of the regions he visited, including the Tien-Shan and the Pamirs.

References in periodicals archive ?
Of Tang Xuanzang's Five Principles, I remember this one the best: some words should never be translated.
Sally Hovey Wriggins wrote: "When Xuanzang finally reached the area near Jalalabad in Pakistan, he felt as Alexander the Great did 9 centuries earlier, that he had entered a new world.
She discusses Kizil as a case study through Xuanzang's records and examines the presence of different Buddhist schools and their doctrines.
Xuanzang was ordained age 13, but 12 years later the curious monk also had a visionary dream and resolved to sneak out of the Tang realm, having failed to gain official permission.
Zhanqian, a goodwill envoy in the Han Dynasty of China (between 140BC-113BC), Fa Xian, an eminent monk of the Eastern Jin Dynasty of China (between 339AD422AD), and XuanZang, an eminent monk of the Tang Dynasty of China (between 629AD-646AD), have all set their feet on this land before.
A Japanese map, the Nansenbushu Bankoku Shoka No Zu (Outline Map of All Countries of the Universe), was drawn in 1710 by Buddhist monk Rokashi Hotan and inspired by the pilgrimage narrative of the Chinese monk Xuanzang (Hsuan-Tsang, 602664), who travelled to India in search of sacred Sanskrit writings.
The earliest reliable mention of the city is in the historical texts and writings of Chinese traveller Xuanzang, who passed through the city in AD630.
So does the 16th Century Journey to the West about Chinese Buddhist monk Xuanzang's pilgrimage to India to study Buddhism and obtain accurate copies of religious texts and the exploits of his three supernatural co-travellers and protectors, especially 'The Monkey King', while Cao Xueqin's 18th century Dream of the Red Chamber, about the decline of a noble family is shorter -- at only 1,800-odd pages.
Sunday in the 10th episode of "A Korean Odyssey," the hip modern twist-and-turn drama of Chinese classic "The Journey to the West," two protagonists a Son Oh-gong, the main character based on monkey king Sun Wukung, and Jin Seon-mi for Xuanzang, the monk, a are engaged in another tug of war to see which of the two loves the other more.
While the Chinese Buddhist monk, Xuanzang or Hue-en-tsang who visited Kashmir in 632 A.D, stayed at Sharda for nearly two years, has valued Pandits who were remarkably brilliant, gifted with insightful wisdom and were genius (Chitkara, 2002).
In the 7th century, a Chinese Buddhist priest Xuanzang went to India to get the Buddhist codes, but he could not stay there.
In 1982, three years after the collapse of the regime, Chinese descendants returned to collect the statues and bring them back to the temples around the city, but two were left behind - the statues of Xuanzang, the sacred monk from the famous Chinese novel Journey to the West, and Tudigong, the Chinese god of earth.