Yahwist

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Yahwist

, Jahwist, Yahvist, Jahvist
Bible the
a. the conjectured author or authors of the earliest of four main sources or strands of tradition of which the Pentateuch is composed and in which God is called Yahweh throughout
b. (as modifier): the Yahwist source
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References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike El, Baal's appropriation into the Yahwistic faith occurred with polemics, which eventually led to a complete rejection of the name Baal and its characteristics.
contends that Yahwistic elements in Proverbs may be early rather than late, and she underscores connections between leading wisdom theological motifs (e.g., creation) with the theology of other sections of the Hebrew Bible.
The Yahwistic narrative of the the Garden of Eden begins with the discussion between the serpent and the woman.
That poem is built upon one syntactic base, as Emerson both echoes and extends the sparse, elusive, tautological, almost palindromic Yahwistic identification, "I am." The copulative is the poem's only verb, and the rest of the poem is composed of a catalogue of adjectival prepositional phrases modifying the predicate nominative "owner" in constructions that contain even more internal parallelism.
The first four chapters provide background information concerning the cosmologies of ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, Israel (both Yahwistic and non-Yahwistic), Persia, Greece, and Rome.
Actually, the Yahwistic idea of Sheol (the netherworld) offered more or less the same miserable pseudo-existence as the Mesopotamian kur.
On the level of the history of religions a distinction has to be made between Yahwism and Judaism, Judaism being the form that the ancient Yahwistic religion adopted in the Hellenistic period.
Actually, for all his harping on Hamlet and Falstaff as bearers of the Yahwistic blessing, "exuberance of being" for all his pseudomysticism and thrillingly solemn rhetoric, Bloom is in the end a rationalist.
Harold Bloom's focus is on J, the Yahwistic writer, the author of what would seem to be the oldest strand of Genesis.
This fascinating book argues carefully and succinctly for a Yahwistic world view in which nature is the ground of Yahweh's activity in just as profound a way as history, and in which the local Canaanite hill country provides the background to the stories of both the primeval and ancestral ages.
The theological discussion of recent years has repeatedly tried to relativize these offensive formulations by means of the statements of the older, so-called Yahwistic creation account of Gen.