Yakima


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to Yakima: Thule

Yakima

, indigenous people of North America
Yakima (yăkˈəmô, –mə), indigenous people of North America whose language belongs to the Sahaptin-Chinook branch of the Penutian linguistic stock (see Native American languages). In the early 19th cent. they lived along the Columbia and Yakima rivers, in central Washington. They then numbered some 1,200. In 1855 an attempt by the United States to place the Yakima on a reservation in Washington resulted in war. Under a capable leader, Kamiakin, the Yakima fought until 1859, when they were subdued. Several other tribes subsequently joined them on the reservation there and were absorbed by the Yakima. The culture of the Yakima was of the Plateau area (see under Natives, North American); they subsisted on salmon, roots, berries, and nuts. Today most live on the Yakima Reservation, where the main sources of income are forestry, construction, and casino gambling. In 1990 there were over 7,500 Yakima in the United States.

Bibliography

See C. Relander, Strangers on the Land (1962).


Yakima

, city, United States
Yakima (yăkˈəmô, –mə), city (1990 pop. 54,827), seat of Yakima co., S central Wash., on the Yakima River just below its confluence with the Naches; inc. 1886. It is the trade and shipping center of an extensive, irrigated agricultural valley noted for its mint, grapes, apples, and hops. It has several fruit canneries and plants that manufacture lumber products, plastics, chemicals, aircraft parts, small arms, and agricultural equipment. The Central Washington State Fair is held in Yakima, and a state fish hatchery is there. The city is also a gateway to Mount Rainier National Park.

Yakima

, river, United States
Yakima (yăkˈəmô, –mə), river, 203 mi (327 km) long, rising in the Cascade Range, central Wash., and flowing SE past Yakima to the Columbia River near Kennewick. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation's Yakima project (begun in 1906) utilizes the Yakima and its tributaries to irrigate c.460,000 acres (186,160 hectares) and has helped make the river valley an important farming and fruit-growing region. A major unit of the project is the Keechelus Dam (completed 1917).
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2022, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
But Yakima Valley dairy farmers were unprepared for what befell them on Feb.
Customers will be able to add a BedRock truck bed rack, compatible with Yakima's SkyRise rooftop tent, or a BaseLine tower and JetStream crossbar cab rack that can be equipped with a basket or awning.
Apart from the above mentioned, Parry Jewelers, the best jewelry store in Yakima, WA also specializes in offering: jewelry appraisals, jewelry insurance, engraving, pearl/beard stringing, and jewelry repairs.
The novel should explore the history of the fur trade in greater detail, including events leading up to the Yakima War Chief Kamiakan's War in the 1850s.
Airlift Northwest services are accessible around the clock from its Yakima base.
Many of the vendors were from Yakima, but experts in the vast agricultural industry came from all over the country and the world.
From involving parents to training staff, by 2008 Yakima will reach a multitude of academic goals outlined in its roadmap to success.
In 1999, the company changed its name to Horizon Distribution after more than 100 years as Yakima Hardware Co.
Yakima offers other, more basic, amenities -- 300 days of sunshine, and "no tornadoes, hurricanes or earthquakes," said Cook.
Yakima Valley is one of three current farm working communities supported by Project REACH.
The success of the arrangement led 14 downtown restaurants and seven wineries in September 2009 to create a corkage-free zone in Yakima for local wines purchased the same day.