yam

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yam,

common name for some members of the Dioscoreaceae, a family of tropical and subtropical climbing herbs or shrubs with starchy rhizomes often cultivated for food. The largest genus, Dioscorea, is commercially important in East Asia and in tropical America. The thick rhizomes, often weighing 30 lb (13.6 kg) or more, are used for human consumption and for feeding livestock. A number of species of Dioscorea are cultivated for extraction of diosgenin, a female hormone precursor used in the manufacture of the contraceptive pill. In the United States, cultivation of yams for food is restricted to the South, but the wild yam (sometimes used medicinally) is indigenous farther north, and another species, the cinnamon vine, is cultivated as a decorative plant. The sweet potatosweet potato,
trailing perennial plant (Ipomoea batatas) of the family Convolvulaceae (morning glory family), native to the New World tropics. Cultivated from ancient times by the Aztecs for its edible tubers, it was introduced into Europe in the 16th cent.
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, which belongs to the morning glory family, is sometimes erroneously called yam. The S African elephant's-foot (Testudinaria elephantipes), also called Hottentot bread and tortoise plant, is sometimes grown in greenhouses; its large rootstock was formerly eaten by the natives. Yams are classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Liliopsida, order Liliales, family Dioscoreaceae.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Yam

 

any one of more than 30 plant species of the genus Dioscorea of the family Dioscoreaceae. Yams are cultivated for their tubers in the tropics and subtropics. The tubers are different morphologically (thickening of the hypocotyl, internodes, or rhizomes). In some species, they reach a length of 1.5 m and a weight of 50 kg. The tubers are used as food in a way similar to potatoes. The poisonous substances found in the tubers of some species are usually destroyed during boiling or baking. The most important species are the Chinese yam (D. batatas), winged yam (D. alata), D. esculenta, and the air potato (D. bulbifera).

REFERENCES

Ipat’ev, A. N. Ovoshchnye rasteniia zemnogo shara. Minsk, 1966.
Siniagin, I. I. Tropicheskoe zemledelie. Moscow, 1968.
Uphof, J. C. T. Dictionary of Economic Plants, 2nd ed. Lehre, 1968.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

What does it mean when you dream about a yam?

Yams are usually associated with the holiday season. The dreamer’s associations with this symbol may be rooted in memories of family celebrations. As a plant that grows under the ground, the yam is also a natural symbol of something deeply rooted in the unconscious mind.

The Dream Encyclopedia, Second Edition © 2009 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.

yam

[yam]
(botany)
A plant of the genus Dioscorea grown for its edible fleshy root.
An erroneous name for the Puerto Rico variety of sweet potato; the edible, starchy tuberous root of the plant.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

yam

1. any of various twining plants of the genus Dioscorea, of tropical and subtropical regions, cultivated for their edible tubers: family Dioscoreaceae
2. Southern US any of certain large varieties of sweet potato
3. a former Scot name for the (common) potato
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
But there are more to get from yams aside from losing extra fats.
Ghana controls Africa's yam export market, which value of $13.7 billion exceeds all other African staple crops equivalent to the combined value of cassava, maize, millet, sorghum and rice.
Yam leaves, botanically classified as Dioscorea villosa, grow on a perennial climbing vine that thrives in tropical and subtropical climates and are members of the Dioscoreaceae family.
Apart from being a huge source of income and dietary calories (eaten boiled, roasted or pounded into a paste), yams are an integral part of burials and marriage cer- emonies in some villages across West Africa.
Seed producers, farmers, processors, traders, exporters and off-takers all play a key role in getting yams overseas.
Add 11/2 teaspoons of the coconut oil to each yam half, distributing the oil evenly with a knife to coat the yam.
Yam (Dioscorea cayennensis Lam.) is a promising alternative crop for small and medium farms in the Brazilian Northeastern region, due to its great potential for external and internal markets (Garrido et al., 2003).
where [y.sub.ij], [d.sup.ij] and [[member of].sub.ij] are the diameter, true diameter, and measurement error, respectively, M is the number of yams in the sample, and N is the number of equally spaced points for which the true diameter to be estimated.
Upon vulcanization, a network of junctures is chemically produced through a crosslink between polymer chains, yam coating and bulk rubber.
Take 3-4 pieces of yam, peeled and cut into slices.
Some researchers investigated the effect of twist level on the tensile mechanical properties of the electrospun yams such as ultimate stress, ultimate strain, elongation at break, and elastic modulus [1, 14, 16, 21, 23, 24, 32, 33].
What's the difference between a yam and a sweet potato?