Yankee barn

Yankee barn

A steeply pitched, timber-framed, side-gabled wood barn of post-and-lintel construction, often with a gambrel roof; usually having no forebay; typically built against a hillside with animals housed at ground level on the lower side adjacent to the barn; similar to a bank barn.
References in periodicals archive ?
In New England, English barns were further adapted into larger, timber-framed structures, which became known as the Yankee barn.
Once you have identified the category, be it an old English, distinctive Dutch, or large Yankee barn, take a closer look at how the timbers are cut and fitted together.
Yankee barns, also called New England barns, allowed for more cattle to be housed, and were the first step in a continuing trend of larger barns to accommodate more animals.
Combining nostalgia, functionality, and high quality modern construction principles, the principal designer of Yankee Barn Homes (Grantham, New Hampshire), the company's president, and the editor of a blog on the subject showcase this type of construction.