Yersinia


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Yersinia

A genus of bacteria in the Enterobacteriaceae family. The bacteria appear as gram-negative rods and share many physiological properties with related Escherichia coli. Of the 11 species of Yersinia, Y. pestis, Y. enterocolitica, and Y. pseudotuberculosis are etiological agents of human disease. Yersinia pestis causes flea-borne bubonic plague (the black death), an extraordinarily acute process believed to have killed over 200 million people during human history. Enteropathogenic Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. enterocolitica typically cause mild chronic enteric infections. The remaining species either promote primary infection of fish (Y. ruckeri) or exist as secondary invaders or inhabitants of natural environments (Y. aldovae, Y. bercovieri, Y. frederiksenii, Y. intermedia, Y. kristensenii, Y. mollaretii, and Y. rohdei). See Medical bacteriology, Plague

Yersinia

[yər′sin·ē·ə]
(microbiology)
A genus of gram-negative, facultative, rod-shaped bacteria in the Enterobacteriaceae family that shares many physiological properties with related Escherichia coli, including metabolic processes and sensitivity to certain bacteriophages.
References in periodicals archive ?
Initiation and spread of traveling waves of plague Yersinia pestis in the western United States.
pseudotuberculosis strains, and 6 additional Yersinia spp.
coli O157, Listeria, Salmonella, Shigella, Yersinia, and Vibrio.
This is the first time that scientists have traced an outbreak of infections caused by Yersinia pseudotuberculosis bacteria to a specific food source, according to reports.
If it is confirmed that the woman died of Yersinia contamination, she will be the first patient in Japan to have died of bacterial contamination from a transfusion.
Tragic Marlene Waplington, 58, was infected by Yersinia, which occurs just once in 800,000 tranfusions each year.
One of the things the tests will show if there is a greater-than-usual infestation of the plague organism - Yersinia pestis - among wild animals.
Chapter titles are: Food Sampling and Preparation of Sample Homogenate; Microscopic Examination of Foods, and Care and Use of the Microscope; Aerobic Plate Count; Escherichia coil and the coliform bacteria; Salmonella; Shigella; Campylobacter; Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis; V.
Infections from four rather common foodborne pathogens - Campylobacter, Salmonella, Shigella, or Yersinia - may lead to reactive arthritis, he says.
Not until the late 1890s did scientists identify Yersinia pestis and its habitats.
com/research/g9pc23/future_horizons) has announced the addition of the "Future Horizons in the Global Yersinia Diagnostic Market: US, Europe, Japan - Test Volume and Sales Forecasts by Country" report to their offering.