Yersinia

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Yersinia

A genus of bacteria in the Enterobacteriaceae family. The bacteria appear as gram-negative rods and share many physiological properties with related Escherichia coli. Of the 11 species of Yersinia, Y. pestis, Y. enterocolitica, and Y. pseudotuberculosis are etiological agents of human disease. Yersinia pestis causes flea-borne bubonic plague (the black death), an extraordinarily acute process believed to have killed over 200 million people during human history. Enteropathogenic Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. enterocolitica typically cause mild chronic enteric infections. The remaining species either promote primary infection of fish (Y. ruckeri) or exist as secondary invaders or inhabitants of natural environments (Y. aldovae, Y. bercovieri, Y. frederiksenii, Y. intermedia, Y. kristensenii, Y. mollaretii, and Y. rohdei). See Medical bacteriology, Plague

McGraw-Hill Concise Encyclopedia of Bioscience. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Yersinia

[yər′sin·ē·ə]
(microbiology)
A genus of gram-negative, facultative, rod-shaped bacteria in the Enterobacteriaceae family that shares many physiological properties with related Escherichia coli, including metabolic processes and sensitivity to certain bacteriophages.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The predominant cause of acute Yersinia infection among children <5 years of age was bioserotype 3/0:3 (Table); 41 of 43 patients were infected with this bioserotype.
([paragraph]) Healthy People 2020 objective targets for incidence of Campylobacter, Listeria, Salmonella, STEC O157, Vibrio, and Yersinia infections per 100,000 population.
Plague and other Yersinia infections. In: Greenough WB III, Merigan TC, editors.
Among the less common bacterial illnesses, Yersinia infections decreased by 49 percent, and Shigella infections declined by 35 percent.
([section]) Healthy People 2020 objective targets for incidence of Campylobacter, Listeria, Salmonella, STEC O157, Vibrio, and Yersinia infections per 100,000 population.
During 1996-2007, 1,903 Yersinia infections were reported in FoodNet sites.
In 2011, FoodNet expanded surveillance to include the collection of epidemiologic and pertinent laboratory data on both culture-confirmed and positive CIDT reports of Campylobacter, Salmonella, Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC), Shigella, Vibrio, and Yersinia infections. Two data sources were examined: a survey of clinical laboratories conducted during January-March 2014 and surveillance data during January 2012-December 2013.