Yersinia

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Yersinia

A genus of bacteria in the Enterobacteriaceae family. The bacteria appear as gram-negative rods and share many physiological properties with related Escherichia coli. Of the 11 species of Yersinia, Y. pestis, Y. enterocolitica, and Y. pseudotuberculosis are etiological agents of human disease. Yersinia pestis causes flea-borne bubonic plague (the black death), an extraordinarily acute process believed to have killed over 200 million people during human history. Enteropathogenic Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. enterocolitica typically cause mild chronic enteric infections. The remaining species either promote primary infection of fish (Y. ruckeri) or exist as secondary invaders or inhabitants of natural environments (Y. aldovae, Y. bercovieri, Y. frederiksenii, Y. intermedia, Y. kristensenii, Y. mollaretii, and Y. rohdei). See Medical bacteriology, Plague

McGraw-Hill Concise Encyclopedia of Bioscience. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Yersinia

[yər′sin·ē·ə]
(microbiology)
A genus of gram-negative, facultative, rod-shaped bacteria in the Enterobacteriaceae family that shares many physiological properties with related Escherichia coli, including metabolic processes and sensitivity to certain bacteriophages.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Evaluation of CD4 (+)/CD8 (+) T-cell expression and IFN-[gamma], perforin secretion for B-T constructs of F1 and V antigens of Yersinia pestis. Int Immunopharmacol.
Relative humidity and temperature affect the transmission of Yersinia pestis from one individual to the other.
Record vet Neil McIntosh said yersinia pestis was so rare that he had not diagnosed a single case in 32 years.
Oyston, "Pathogenesis of Yersinia pestis infection in BALB/c mice: effects on host macrophages and neutrophils" Infection and Immunity, vol.
Yersinia pestis prevalence ranged from 0 (colonies FBIR 94 and 125) to 44.4% (colony BLM 42) with a mean [+ or -] SE of 12.06 [+ or -] 4.57% (Table 3).
Other work at Wyndmoor has yielded a new test that, according to preliminary results, can detect Yersinia pestis, the causal agent of bubonic plague, in milk inoculated with this pathogen for laboratory tests.
Plague (Yersinia pestis) Infection: A rare bacterial disease associated with rodents and cats and fleas.
The source was a bacteria, Yersinia pestis, that is found in the gut of fleas and thrives in the blood of rats.
By recreating growth conditions in flea carriers and mammal hosts, scientists at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have uncovered 176 proteins and likely proteins in the plague bacterium Yersinia pestis whose numbers rise and fall with the virulence of the disease.
Human infection is usually acquired through bites from rodent fleas infected with Yersinia pestis.
At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Sandra McCutchen-Maloney studies Yersinia pestis, the cause of bubonic plague.