Yersinia

(redirected from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Acronyms, Wikipedia.
Related to Yersinia pseudotuberculosis: Yersinia enterocolitica

Yersinia

A genus of bacteria in the Enterobacteriaceae family. The bacteria appear as gram-negative rods and share many physiological properties with related Escherichia coli. Of the 11 species of Yersinia, Y. pestis, Y. enterocolitica, and Y. pseudotuberculosis are etiological agents of human disease. Yersinia pestis causes flea-borne bubonic plague (the black death), an extraordinarily acute process believed to have killed over 200 million people during human history. Enteropathogenic Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. enterocolitica typically cause mild chronic enteric infections. The remaining species either promote primary infection of fish (Y. ruckeri) or exist as secondary invaders or inhabitants of natural environments (Y. aldovae, Y. bercovieri, Y. frederiksenii, Y. intermedia, Y. kristensenii, Y. mollaretii, and Y. rohdei). See Medical bacteriology, Plague

Yersinia

[yər′sin·ē·ə]
(microbiology)
A genus of gram-negative, facultative, rod-shaped bacteria in the Enterobacteriaceae family that shares many physiological properties with related Escherichia coli, including metabolic processes and sensitivity to certain bacteriophages.
References in periodicals archive ?
Human and nonhuman infections caused by Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in Canada from 1962 to 1985.
Bacteria Viruses Acinetobacter spp (3) Coxsackievirus (3) Campylobacter spp (12,13) enteroviruses (24) Chlamydia trachomatis (14,15) poliovirus (3) Enterobacter spp (3) rotavirus (11) Enterococcus spp (3) Parasites Escherichia coli O157:H7 (6,16-19) Cryptosporidium parvum (25) Helicobactor pylori (9) Endolimax nana (26) Klebsiella spp (3) Entamoeba coli (26) Proteus spp (3) Entamoeba histolytica (26) Psuedomonas spp (3) Giardia lamblia (5,27-29) Salmonella enteritidis (7,20) Isospora spp (26) Shigella sonnei (16,21,22) Sarcocystis spp (30) Staphylococcus aureus (22,23) Toxoplsma gondii (31) Streptococcus (22) Vibrio cholerae (10) Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (8) Table 2.
Serotype differences and lack of biofilm formation characterize Yersinia pseudotuberculosis infection of the Xenopsylla cheopis flea vector of Yersinia pestis.
The 102-kilobase pgm locus of Yersinia pestis: sequence analysis and comparison of selected regions among different Yersinia pestis and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis strains.
announced today that it has received a biodefense partnership grant award from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) to analyze the genomes of approximately 150 Yersinia pestis and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis strains.
To the Editor: Illness caused by Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is mainly characterized by fever and acute abdominal pain due to mesenteric lymphadenitis that mimics appendicitis.
Yersinia pestis, which causes bubonic plague, is a relatively recent offshoot, perhaps only 1,500 to 20,500 years old, of the less dangerous Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, Mark Achtman of the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics in Berlin and his colleagues report in the Nov.
Cases of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis infection increased in France during the winter of 2004-05 in the absence of epidemiologic links between patients or strains.
The researchers base their conclusions on studies of two strains of bacteria, Yersinia pestis, which causes plague, and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, which confers resistance to plague but causes only mild symptoms.
Called invasin by its discoverers, the newly described protein is necessary for the bacterium Yersinia pseudotuberculosis to penetrate epithelial cells, say scientists from Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston and Stanford University School of Medicine.
Two cases of community-acquired septicemia caused by serotype-O1 Yersinia pseudotuberculosis were diagnosed in middle-aged, HIV-positive, immunodeficient patients during an 8-month period.
Homology with a repeated Yersinia pestis DNA sequence IS100 correlates with pesticin sensitivity in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis.