Yaqui

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Yaqui

(yä` kē), people of Sonora, Mexico, settled principally along the Yaqui river. Their language is of Uto-Aztecan stock. They engage in weaving and agriculture; many work in the cotton regions of Sonora and S Arizona. The Yaqui have proved to be warlike and have opposed encroachments on their lands. In the late 19th cent. under the Mexican dictator Porfirio Díaz they were ruthlessly persecuted and many were deported to plantations at Yucatán and Quintana Roo, over 2,000 mi (3,200 km) away. Some escaped and returned on foot to Sonora. The Mexican government attempted to control resistance by further resettlement, and many Yaqui emigrated to Arizona to escape subjugation. Later, efforts were made to improve their lot. There are about 10,000 Yaqui today in the United States and at least an equal number in Mexico.

Bibliography

See E. H. Spicer, Potam, a Yaqui Village in Sonora (1954); R. W. Giddings, Yaqui Myths and Legends (1959); R. Moisés, The Tall Candle (1971).

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Yaqui

a river in NW Mexico, rising near the border with the US and flowing south to the Gulf of California. Length: about 676 km (420 miles)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Tumbaga studies the representation of the Yoeme (Yaqui) nation and its symbols in Mexican and Chicana/o literature through the genres and discourses that have partaken in the creation of Yaqui indigeneity.
Yoeme alleges that Montezuma and the Aztecs were equal to Cortes and the Europeans in 'blood worship': 'Those who worshiped destruction and blood secretly knew one another (Jarman 159).
However, Yoeme is not free from influence like Melquiades seems to be; Yoeme is not outside or objective.
(61) Zeta and Lecha, who on the surface might appear to be out of balance, have inherited a role from Yoeme as being warrior-mothers for the people as a whole, both on a spiritual and physical level.
The first is the use of the almanac, which tells the history of the Indians in their movement north from Mexico and which needs to be transcribed, according to the old woman Yoeme, who has been the almanac's caretaker until she passes it on to her grandchildren, Zeta and Lecha.
In addition, Lecha and Zeta are in the process of recopying a series of notebooks given to them by their grandmother, Yoeme, which contains the spiritual heart of their ancestors and which is the spiritual center of the novel.
(15) The Hopis and the Yoemes, to take only two examples, have every right as tribal nations to restrict or prohibit access to their archives, ceremonies, and cultural material.