Yoknapatawpha County


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Yoknapatawpha County

northern Mississippi; decadent setting for Faulkner’s novels. [Am. Lit.: Hart, 955]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
This essay will argue that, within his saga of the mythic Yoknapatawpha county, Faulkner dramatizes a variety of possible reactions to Emerson's invitation to draw philosophical conclusions from the natural world.
Vonnegut has created a universe, not unlike Faulkner's Yoknapatawpha County in comprehensiveness and craft, in which the author can offer his own yearnings for what humankind must do to survive in an era capable of, and willing to, exercise mass murder.
Compson family Fictional characters created by Faulkner, William (Cuthbert) in his novels about Yoknapatawpha County, Mississippi, including Absalom, Absalom!, The Town, and The Mansion.
Alexandria and its Hellenistic realm (the eastern Mediterranean in particular) were for him what Yoknapatawpha County was for Faulkner, Dublin for Joyce, New England for Robert Frost.
This novel's setting in the small town of Macondo, which first appeared in Leaf Storm, established it as a fictional territory that resonates as powerfully as Faulkner's Yoknapatawpha County for many readers.
After early undistinguished efforts in verse (The Marble Faun, 1924) and fiction (Soldier's Pay, 1926; Mosquitoes, 1927), William Faulkner moved suddenly into the forefront of American literature in 1929 with the appearance of Sartoris and The Sound and the Fury, the first installments in the artistically complex and subtly satirical saga of Yoknapatawpha County that would be spun out further in As I Lay Dying (1930), Light in August (1932), Absalom, Absalom!
Among the first families to settle in Yoknapatawpha County, the McCaslins evidence -- more directly than any other Faulkner characters -- the guilt of slaveholding, which continues to influence their lives after the Civil War.
--Legend from Faulkner's first map of Yoknapatawpha County, included in first edition of Absalom, Absalom!
In addition to its echoes of specific lyrics, the odyssey of the Bundrens--as they carry the body of Addie Bundren from the remotest rural corner of Yoknapatawpha County to the town of Jefferson for burial--reflects the gender politics of folk song traditions and dramatizes country music's relationship to twentieth-century culture.
Gaines's novels are set in rural Louisiana, often in a fictional plantation area named Bayonne that some critics have compared to William Faulkner's Yoknapatawpha County. In addition to The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman , his novels include Catherine Carmier (1964), Of Love and Dust (1967), In My Father's House (1978), and A Gathering of Old Men (1983).
Spanning almost fifty years in time, the trilogy is centered on the innumerable and vicious <IR> SNOPES </IR> family, whose first member invades Yoknapatawpha County in the early years of the 20th century.
Educated at Harvard and Heidelberg, Stevens is a lawyer and later the county attorney in Jefferson, Mississippi; he comments philosophically on events in Yoknapatawpha County, although he is rarely directly involved in them.