Yom Yerushalayim


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Yom Yerushalayim

Between May 9 and June 6; Iyyar 28
Jerusalem Day commemorates the capture and reunification of Jerusalem during the Six-Day War (on 28 Iyyar 5727 on the Jewish calendar—June 7, 1967), after which Israel gained possession of the Old City of Jerusalem, which had been under Jordanian rule, and other Arab lands. It is the most recent addition to the Jewish calendar and is observed primarily in Israel.
Although there are no specific rituals connected with this relatively new holiday, it is common to recite the Hallel (Psalms 115-118), Psalm 107, and the Aleinu, or concluding prayer. Because this day falls during the Lag ba-Omer period—which begins on the second night of Passover and continues through Shavuot—the mourning customs traditionally observed during this time are suspended for the day.
CONTACTS:
Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations of America
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Holidays, Festivals, and Celebrations of the World Dictionary, Fourth Edition. © 2010 by Omnigraphics, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Israelis were already celebrating Yom Yerushalayim -- Jerusalem Day, the 51st anniversary of the reunification of the city during the 1967 Six Day War -- when the win was announced at 2 a.m.
Of course, Yom Ha'Shoah (Holocaust Remembrance Day), Yom Ha'Atzma'ut (Israel Independence Day), and Yom Yerushalayim (Jerusalem Re-unification Day) all appear on the Hebrew calendars that we display in our homes.