Yung-lo

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Related to Yongle Emperor: Yung Lo, Zheng He

Yung-lo

(yo͞ong-lô), 1359–1424, reign title of the 3d emperor (1403–24) of the Chinese MingMing
, dynasty of China that ruled from 1368 to 1644. The first Ming emperor, Chu Yüan-chang (ruled 1368–98), a former Buddhist monk, joined a rebellion in progress, gained control of it, overthrew the Mongol Yüan dynasty, and unified all of China proper.
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 dynasty, whose personal name was Chu Ti. He rose to power in N China after being delegated by his father, the Ming founding emperor Hung Wu (reigned 1368–98), to lead the fight against the retreating Mongols. He usurped the throne from his nephew, Emperor Chien Wen (reigned 1399–1402), after a devastating civil war. Under his reign six maritime expeditions led by the Muslim eunuch Cheng HoCheng Ho
or Zheng He
, 1371–c.1433, admiral, diplomat, and explorer during China's Ming dynasty. At 10 he was captured by Chinese troops in Yunnan, castrated, and sent into the army.
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 sailed as far as Arabia and E Africa, and tributary relations were established with many kingdoms in SE Asia. Yung-lo focused his energy, however, on securing defense in the north. As emperor he personally led five vast military campaigns far across the steppe to subdue the Mongol tribes. The importance of the north was confirmed when in 1421 he moved the capital from Nanjing to Beijing, just S of the Great WallGreat Wall of China,
series of fortifications, c.3,890 mi (6,260 km) long (not including trenches and natural defensive barriers), winding across N China from Gansu prov. to Liaoning prov.
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.
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Grags pa rgyal mtshan is not to be confused with the fifth Pha mo gru administrator contemporanous with the Yongle emperor. He should be identical with the Grags pa bkra shis rgyal mtshan mentioned in the imperial edict of 1562.
Another author examines the subject of the early Ming daoxue proponent, Fang Xiaoru, and his unsuccessful struggle to preserve an idealized version of high antiquity as a bulwark against the Yongle emperor. Nowhere do these authors seek to uncover patterns across time or to probe the creative tension between Confucian and occult thought.
He commanded the maritime expeditions as a military agent of the Yongle emperor, a ruler who had no interest in voyages of discovery....
The sultan traveled to China to pay tribute to the Yongle Emperor of the Ming dynasty in Beijing.
As Filippo Brunelleschi's dome neared completion in the 1430s, the Ming Yongle emperor had been resident for some 15 years in the newly built 980-building complex of the Forbidden City, in his relocated capital of Beijing.
Consider this: in 1417 Sultan Paduku Batara of Jolo visited Zhu Di, the third emperor of the Ming Dynasty (best known as the Yongle emperor) at the reestablished Imperial Palace in Beijing.
This foreign esoteric Buddhism, it's religious fascination and political function, and it's exotic visual world was in fact concentrated and limited to imperial demand and patronage, be it the passionate personal attachment to the Tibetan hierarchs and to their sacred meditational images under the Yongle emperor of the early Ming, be it the much discussed support of Tibetan Buddhism by the Qianlong emperor between political considerations and private interest.
In May 1403, when Europe was still emerging from the Middle Ages, the Yongle Emperor, Zhu Di (1402-1424) was busy putting together a fleet of 1,681 ocean-going ships.
The Sultan of Sulu, 600 years ago, set on sail from the Southern Philippines to pay tribute to the Yongle emperor of the Ming dynasty in Beijing.
Particularly sought after, according to Cristi, are pieces with a Chinese imperial mark, especially of the Yongle Emperor, who lured Tibetan and Nepalese craftsmen to the imperial workshop.
Produced for a Tibetan monastery by the imperial workshops of the Yongle Emperor (reigned 1402-24), it changed hands for a mighty and unexpected HK$236m (US$30m).
Dating to either the Qianlong or Jiaqing period (1735-1800), it seems that they were modelled after the famous Porcelain Pagoda of Nanjing, built in the 15th century on the orders of the Yongle Emperor to honour his parents, and considered one of the Seven Wonders of the World by some later European travellers.