Yorkist


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Yorkist

English history
a member or adherent of the royal house of York, esp during the Wars of the Roses
References in periodicals archive ?
This latest volume describes three Lancastrian attempts to overthrow the Yorkists, ending with the death of Edward's successor, Richard III, at Bosworth in 1485--and the accession of Henry VII and the rise of the Tudor dynasty.
SIR, THE YORKIST LOUTS ARE BOILIN' OVER THE HILLS LIKE ROACHES
She was born in Saltley and married Robert Arden who was executed in 1452 for organising troops for the Yorkist cause - Richard III's faction - against King Henry Vl at the beginning of the last phase of the Wars of the Roses.
He was out of jail by 1462, and at that time he appears to have been a Yorkist who supported the new king Edward IV, for in that year he had gone on a Yorkist expedition to the north to fight the Lancastrians (Field, Life 30).
Although Henry VIII, as the grandson of Edward IV, found his Yorkist lineage more immediately useful in asserting his dynastic legitimacy, Henry VI was remembered warmly by the Tudors and their heirs, products themselves of the union of Lancaster and York.
Her previous book, The White Queen, followed the life of Yorkist Elizabeth Woodville, mother of the ill-fated Princes in the Tower.
But as the sister of Edward IV, the newly crowned Yorkist King of England, in an age of civil war, Margaret is not allowed the liberty of preferences.
The March battle--reputedly the bloodiest ever to have been fought on English soil--was significant at the time, as the decisive Yorkist victory over the Lancastrians led to the coronation of King Edward IV later that year.
Harris's important and engaging study draws from family archives (including marriage contracts, accounts, inventories, letters), State Papers, Chancery cases, and over a thousand men's and women's wills to argue that aristocratic Yorkist and early Tudor women's responsibilities "constituted female careers" which, although "not professions in the modern sense," gave them considerable power over their families, servants, and communities (5).
We've been shadow boxing with our own version of a Lancastrian and Yorkist rivalry.
Bishop John Fisher's month-mind (sermon) on Lady Margaret Beaufort (1509), which presents her as an exemplary female, is one of the few that survive and may have been the first to have been printed, but the frequency with which Yorkist and early Tudor aristocratic women bequeathed money for their month-minds makes it unlikely that it was unique.
WHAT was the family name of the Angevin, Lancastrian, |and Yorkist Kings of England (1154-1485)?