Aku

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Related to Yoruba people: Yoruba culture, Zulu people

adaption kit upgrade

A collection of software fixes and enhancements from Microsoft that is applied to the Windows Mobile operating system. The adaption kit modifications are given to the phone manufacturer, which makes the changes in the phone's firmware. Adaption kit upgrade versions are identified as AKU1, AKU2, etc. See service pack.

Aku

(pop culture)
Aku, the merciless shapeshifter who describes himself as “the Master of Masters, the Deliverer of Darkness, the Shogun of Sorrow,” was created by animator Genndy Tartakovsky (who also developed the animated hit Dexter's Laboratory) in “The Beginning” (original airdate: August 10, 2001), the premiere installment of the Cartoon Network's Samurai Jack (2001–2004). Eons ago, a consortium of deities—Odin, Ra, and Rama—narrowly subdues a primeval entity of absolute malevolence. Yet a vestige of this amorphous evil survives, creeping like a virus across the globe, the eradication of the dinosaurs among its atrocities. Millennia later, after slaughtering countless Japanese warriors, the demonic force is wounded by a magic arrow but does not die, instead taking the form of Aku. After being imprisoned by an emperor who brandishes a supernatural sword, Aku escapes years later: “Once again, I am free to smite the world as I did in days long past.” He is challenged by the magic sword–wielding Samurai Jack, who has trained his whole life for the eventuality of Aku's return, but the shapeshifting menace banishes the young nomad to the future, “where my evil is law.” And thus Samurai Jack roams the Aku-ruled future Earth, with its dangerous robots, aliens, and Aku's minions (with sinister names like Demongo), seeking a chronal gateway to return to the past to defeat the Deliverer of Darkness before his global empire is built. (Tartakovsky initially drew fire for plagiarizing Frank Miller's similarly themed DC Comics 1983–1984 miniseries Ronin; nonetheless, Samurai Jack quickly established and maintained its own identity throughout its celebrated 52-episode run.) This colorful villain, a Kabuki horror emerging from hellfire, was bloodcurdlingly voiced by Japanese actor Mako, whose numerous film credits include The Sand Pebbles (1966), Conan the Barbarian (1982), and Bulletproof Monk (2003). Aku's malevolence inspired the video game Samurai Jack: The Shadow of Aku (2004), plus a “Flame Blade Aku” action figure and a 12-inch maquette. While Samurai Jack has been relegated to DVD collections and an occasional Cartoon Network rerun, its brave hero still battles Aku in the far-flung era.
References in periodicals archive ?
In fact, in Wande Abimbola's view, the belief of the Yoruba people is that morality is the essence of man.
In Ogunyemi's plays, drama and history become the means for a celebration and a retelling of the history of the Yoruba people. In one of the interviews conducted by Yerima (1983) Oguyemi responded that; "I write historical plays, because first, I want to attempt to capture and document the history of our people.
But such persons have always been fringe elements in Yoruba society and their extreme kinds of religious passion have always had very little influence among their Yoruba people and have usually been superficial and short-lived.
Ori itself attracts a lot of significance among Yoruba people (Lawal, 2001; Barber, 1981; Adogame, 2000; Morton-Williams, 1960; Abimbola, 2004; Awolalu, 1973).
Covenant-Keeping among the Yoruba People: A Critique of Socio-Political-Transformation in Nigeria, International Journal of Humanities and Social Science 3 (9), 83-84.
A great American once said, 'To some generations much is given; of other generations much is expected.' It is my profound belief that we of today's generation of Yoruba people are called upon to give much to our Yoruba nation and to the world, and that we do have much to give.
"Traditional medicine practices among the Yoruba people of Nigeria: a historical perspective." Journal of Medicinal Plants Studies, vol.
Charms inform of wristlets are also made from aso-oke when combine with the skin of the alligator, and supported with some rituals and incantations which the Yoruba people refers to as "ijunpa" (armlet) or "ounde" (waist band).
In this analysis of the dialectical relationship between Yoruba proverbs and names we now understand that the relationship serves as an influence in arousing, manifesting and establishing the expectations, aspirations and consciousness of Yoruba people in building and developing their nation-state, and thus it could be asserted that most Yoruba sons and daughters who misbehave in leadership positions are either not aware of proverbs that correlate to their names or they are simply not cognizance of the virtues and values upon which their role-expectations, aspirations and consciousness are built upon.
As a way of winning people to themselves, the feudal lords in the North had always hidden under religion to deceive some Yoruba people.
THE Yoruba tribal marks are scarifications which are specific identification and beautification marks designed on the face or body of the Yoruba people. The tribal marks are part of the Yoruba culture inscribed on the body by burning or laceration of the skin, usually done at birth.
It is the Yoruba people who voted the governors into office; it is not the party, so their loyalty should, first of all, be to the people who put them in office.