Shigeru Yoshida

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Yoshida, Shigeru

 

Born Sept. 22, 1878, in Tokyo; died Oct. 20, 1967, in Oiso. Japanese politician.

Yoshida graduated from the law school of Tokyo Imperial University in 1906 and served for many years in the Foreign Ministry of Japan. In 1943–44 he was involved in a conspiracy against the prime minister, General H. Tojo. From May 1946 to December 1954 (with an interruption from June 1947 to October 1948) he was prime minister of five cabinets. Yoshida was president of the Japanese Liberal party (1946–48), the Democratic-Liberal Party (1948–50), and the Liberal Party (1950–54) He was anti-Soviet and worked actively for a strengthening of relations between Japan and the USA, for a remilitarization of his country, and for suppression of democratic forces. He signed the San Francisco Treaty of 1951. [10–1149 -3]

References in periodicals archive ?
Named after former Prime Minister Yoshida Shigeru, this doctrine formed the basis of Japan's foreign policy during the Cold War.
Rekishi ni Kieta Sanbo, Yoshida Shigeru to Tatsumi Eiichi (52): Sori Daijin no '007' o Tsukure.
The prime minister of Japan, Yoshida Shigeru, welcomed the treaty as "fair and generous.
Its leader, Yukio Hatoyama, is an uncharismatic scion of yet another established dynasty: His grandfather, Hatoyama Ichiro, took over as prime minister in 1954 from Yoshida Shigeru, who was the grandfather of the last LDP Prime Minister Taro Aso.
Its leader, Yukio Hatoyama, is an uncharismatic scion of yet another established dynasty -- his grandfather, Hatoyama Ichiro, took over as prime minister in 1954 from Yoshida Shigeru, who was the grandfather of the last LDP Prime Minister Taro Aso.
Letter from Douglas MacArthur to Yoshida Shigeru (Mar.
Samuels describes the mainstream faction as a group of pragmatic conservative LDP politicians and their allies led by postwar Prime Minister Yoshida Shigeru [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (1878-1967, in office 1946-47 and 1948-54).
As Prime Minister Yoshida Shigeru noted, this represented "a gift from the gods.
Leading Japan out of the ruins of World War II, presiding over a once-shattered political and economic system, Japan's visionary prime minister, Yoshida Shigeru, charted a new course for this country in the postwar era.
They are historically difficult to mobilize behind a common national vision, and no Yoshida Shigeru or Konrad Adenauer can be expected to emerge from a ruling class that inclines toward demagogy and corruption.
Ishibashi Tanzan, Finance Minister in the first government of Yoshida Shigeru (May 22, 1946-May 24, 1947), was also a vociferous supporter of the indemnity payments.
Although one would expect the man who wrote Empire and Aftermath: Yoshida Shigeru and the Japanese Experience, 1878-1954 and War without Mercy to provide a clear analysis of the political situation, John W.