Yoshigo

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Yoshigo

 

a two-level archaeological remain constituting a shell mound. It is located in the south of the island of Honshu in the prefecture of Aichi in Japan. The upper level contains finds from the Bronze Age (of the Yayoi culture). Below, 340 human skeletons have been discovered dating from the Neolithic (the late and last periods of the Jomon). The dead were usually buried in a flexed position, although now and then in a sitting and quite rarely in a supine position. The front teeth were sometimes missing or deformed. Some of the skeletons were sprinkled with ocher, others were burned, and still others had undergone reburial. Some skeletons (children’s) were buried in urns. The funerary inventory includes seashell rings, earrings, and bracelets; bone pendants; and clay female figurines.

REFERENCE

Vorob’ev, M. V. Drevniaia laponiia. Moscow, 1958.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The sites include Ikawazu, Inariyama, and Yoshigo (Fig.
Ikawazu is similar to Inariyama in scale and smaller than Yoshigo.
Overall, the Inariyama site appears to fall into a similar category as the Ikawazu and Yoshigo sites (Pattern A) inasmuch as it was occupied over a long period of time.
These individuals all originated from the Yoshigo site and were not included in this analysis due to the obscure nature of tooth-extraction style.
In addition, a recent study from the Yoshigo site suggests that individuals buried with hip ornaments ate a distinct diet from those without these ornaments (Kiriyama and Kusaka 2017).
Work by Funahashi (2003, 2010) includes the Yoshigo and Inariyama sites as well as the Tsukumo site and argues that this process appears in individuals around 13.0 years of age, with some potentially earlier cases recorded around 10.5 years.
Radiocarbon dates applied to individuals with tooth extraction from the Yoshigo and Ikawazu sites may help further address this problem.
Prehistoric diet and mortuary practices in the Jomon period: Isotopic evidence from human skeletal remains from the Yoshigo shell mound.
The Shell Mounds of Yoshigo: A Report on the Archaeological Excavations by The Commission for the Protection of Cultural Properties, Volume I.
Patterns of social identity in relation to ritual tooth ablation among prehistoric Jomon foragers from the Yoshigo site, Aichi Prefecture, Japan.
Research into the Yoshigo and Inariyama skeletal remains at a site in southeastern Aichi Prefecture indicates that several types of tooth extraction were practiced during these times.