Yuaikai

Yuaikai

 

(Fraternity), a Japanese workers’ organization that was founded in Tokyo in 1912 with the help of the capitalist Shi-busawa Eiichi. Its leading figure was Suzuki Bunji.

The Yuaikai, which sought to organize mutual assistance and educational work among the workers, initially advocated class cooperation. During the period of decline in the socialist and working-class movement that followed the Kotoku Denjiro affair, it was the only workers’ organization in Japan. As the working-class movement experienced an upsurge under the influence of the Great October Socialist Revolution in Russia, the Yuaikai moved away from a policy of class cooperation and became a mass trade union organization. By 1920 it numbered 20,000 members and had branches in every major city. In 1919, the Yuaikai was reorganized as a federation of trade unions, which has been called the Nihon Rodo Sodomei (Japan Federation of Labor) since 1921 (seeJAPAN FEDERATION OF LABOR).

References in periodicals archive ?
Two years ago, Vancouver Okinawaken Yuaikai held a benefit concert for the same cause.
The first labor organization to form during the Taisho Democracy, the Yuaikai, commanded a rapidly growing membership, (184) and along with other labor organizations in Japan, championed, almost verbatim, the main tenets of the platform of the newly-formed International Labor Organization (ILO): (185) an eight hour work day and forty-eight hour work week; prohibition of night labor; establishment of a minimum wage; and equal pay for men and women.
(404) Similarly, workers' demands in the post-World War II period closely mirrored demands by earlier labor organizations from the Taisho period such as the Yuaikai, which subscribed to the ILO's platform.
The main trade union, the Yuaikai, originally founded by Christian social reformers (see Morris-Suzuki 1989: 75) was pushed to the left and the number of fledgling unions rose dramatically.