Yung Wing


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Yung Wing 容閎
Birthday
BirthplaceNanping, Xiangshan, Guangdong, Qing Empire
Died

Yung Wing

(1828–1912) Chinese official, educational reformer; born in Nam Ping, Pedro Island, China. He was the first Chinese to graduate from an American college (Yale, 1854); his memoir, My Life in China and America (1909), reflects his divided life thereafter. As commissioner of the Chinese Educational Mission (1870–81), he brought other Chinese students to America until a counter-reform Chinese government stopped his efforts.

Yung Wing

 

(Jung Hung). Born Nov. 17, 1828; died Apr. 21, 1912. Chinese political leader and reformer.

Yung Wing received his technical education in the United States, from 1847 to 1853. After returning to China in 1854, he fought for the passage of moderate reforms and propagated western scientific and technological ideas. He moved to the USA in 1883 but returned to China in 1895, where he took part in the Hundred Days of Reform movement (1898); after its defeat he managed to escape. He lived in the USA from 1902 until his death.

WORKS

Yung Wing. My Life in China and America. New York, 1909.
References in periodicals archive ?
Yung Wing, the first Chinese student to receive a degree from an American university
The first Chinese student to graduate from an American college was Yung Wing, a naturalized American who received his Bachelor of Arts degree from Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut this month in 1854.
His English wife taught Yung Wing, who later became the first Chinese graduate of an American university.
124, Yung Wing Elementary, is named after the first Chinese student to attend and graduate from an American college, specifically Yale University.
Bieler speaks of three waves of students, beginning with Yung Wing, the first Chinese to graduate from an American university (Yale, 1854).
Schools involved include: PS 161 Don Albizu Campos School and PS 375 Mosaic Preparatory Academy in East Harlem and PS 124 Yung Wing Elementary School in Chinatown.
14) Despite the flaws in Morrison's first translation, Yung Wing, a Yale University graduate (the first Chinese to graduate from any American university), later wrote about Morrison: "The importance and bearing of his dictionary and the translation of the Bible into Chinese, on subsequent missionary work in China, were fundamental and paramount.