ZX Spectrum


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ZX Spectrum

(computer)
Sinclair's first personal computer with a colour display. The Spectrum used the Zilog Z80 processor like its predecessors the ZX-80 and ZX-81. It was originally available in 16k and 48k versions using cassette tape and later grew to 128k and sprouted floppy disks. It had a wider and more solid case and a marginally better "dead flesh" keyboard. Unlike the earlier models, it didn't require the presence of a cold carton of milk to prevent it overheating. It was possibly the most popular home computer in the UK for many years.

The TK-90X was a clone.
References in periodicals archive ?
A The ZX Spectrum was created by Sir Clive Sinclair and was one of the best selling computers of all time.
From a young age I was more passionate about working on the computer than I was about school, and after my experiences with both the ZX Spectrum and Atari console, I was inspired to write my first game, ing my A-levels at school, I still wenon to sell my first computer company at the age of 25.
As part of this presentation, Ben will demonstrate the finished build of his latest project: a custom, handheld ZX Spectrum.
The report added that now in its 31st year, the awards were first given out back in 1983, with the first Game of the Year award going to Jet Pac on the ZX Spectrum.
Items buried included a ZX Spectrum computer, a laptop computer, Newcastle and Sunderland football shirts, a bottle of champagne, photos of Aspire HQ Heworth House past and present, and an Aspire uniform.
I didn't rush out to buy a ZX Spectrum, but then I did jump on the Commodore Amiga.
Not surprisingly the ZX81 went back to WH Smiths and I didn't play on a computer again until my cousin got a ZX Spectrum that had flashier ways of breaking - the screen flashed red and green a lot if you got the volume on the tape recorder wrong.
The first computer I ever used was at the age of six in the summer of 1985 and it was a Sinclair ZX Spectrum.
40 Uttoxeter Contact Sam Cruise is a computer game created by David Reidy for the ZX Spectrum and released by Microsphere in 1986.
When you see mobile phones the size of house bricks or green screen terminals it takes me back to the 'heady days' of when home computers such as the Sinclair ZX81, the ZX Spectrum, Dragon 32 and Commodore 64 first burst on to the scene.
More than a million fans rushed for tickets online, resulting in a national frenzy of right-handed mouse clicking not seen since the release of Daley Thompson's Decathlon game on the ZX Spectrum all those years ago.
Yes, but surely that's now written by a ten-line ZX Spectrum computer programme.