Zadonsk


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Zadonsk

 

a city and center of Zadonsk Raion, Lipetsk Oblast, RSFSR. It is located on the left bank of the Don, on the highway between Moscow and Voronezh, 25 km to the southeast of the Ulusarka railroad station on the Elets-Kastornoe line. The city is the site of a plant for drying vegetables, a creamery, and a food-processing plant. There is a technicum for the mechanization and electrification of agriculture and a cultural education school.

Zadonsk was known in the 14th century by the name Teshev (derived from the Teshevka River, which flows through the city). Toward the end of the 16th century, Teshev was razed by the Tatars. The city was rebuilt at the beginning of the 17th century. The formation of the Voronezh vicegerency in 1779 resulted in the designation of Teshev, which was renamed Zadonsk, as the district seat.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ivanov, "Reforming Orthodoxy: Russian Bishops and Their Church, 1721-1801" (PhD diss., Yale University, 2012); Ivanov, "The Saint of Russian Reformation: Tikhon of Zadonsk and Protestant Influences in the 18th-Century Russian Orthodox Church," in Religion and Identity in Russia and the Soviet Union: A Festschrift for Paul Bushkovitch, ed.
Their topics include expressions of non-elite identity and perspectives in pre-Petrine Russia, Tikhon of Zadonsk and Protestant influences in the 18th-century Russian Orthodox Church, the Reformation in Finland, the rite of Orthodoxy in modern Russia, and Theodore Dreiser's Russian Diary.
In all things, men are "manager, not lord," in the formula of Bishop Tikhon of Zadonsk. According to Pavel Buryshkin, who wrote on the attitudes and mores of the nineteenth-century commercial elite, this sort of thinking was well ingrained, as was the notion that God would ultimately hold individuals accountable for how they had managed His "estate." (77) These ideas can easily be generalized towards animals, which were clearly also a gift of God and part of His estate.
Tikhon of Zadonsk (1724-1783) was the first great Russian staretz (elder), and his legacy was influential for centuries through the elders of Optina monastery.
(33) The influence of Catholic spirituality on St Tikhon of Zadonsk (34) can equally be sensed.
See, for example, Vera Koroleva, ed., Sviatitel" Nikolai, mitropolit Alma-Atinskii i Kazakhstanskii (Moscow: Palomnik, 2000); and S liubov'iu k liudiam: Po vospominaniiam o skhiigumene Mitrofane (Miakitine) (Zadonsk: Izdatel'stvo Zadonskogo muzhskogo monastyria, 2005).
In Russia itself, figures such as Tikhon of Zadonsk and Serafim of Sarov were searching for renewed monastic life.