Zaidis


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Zaidis

 

(also, Zaydis), the followers of a moderate Shiite sect, formed in the eighth century in the Abbasid Caliphate. The founder of the sect was Zayd ibn Ali, the grandson of the third Shiite imam Husayn. A Zaidi state existed in the ninth and tenth centuries in what is now Iran, in the regions of Gilan and Tabaristan. In the tenth century the Zaidis extended their power to part of Yemen, where the imams ruled until the revolution of Sept. 26, 1962. The Zaidis constitute a considerable part of the population of the Yemen Arab Republic. Theologically, the Zaidis follow the Mutazilites. Certain features of their way of life differentiate the Zaidis from other Shiites: they reject the doctrine of the “hidden imam,” the practice of the taqiya (the tactical dissimulation of faith), and temporary marriages.

REFERENCE

Beliaev, E. A.Musul’Manskoe sektantstvo. Moscow, 1957. 19957
References in periodicals archive ?
Shahid Zaidi, the organiser of the exhibition, later explained it to a fairly big gathering that captions were not given out of the fear of plagiarism as, according to Mr Zaidi, many of the photos which belonged to Zaidis, were posted on Facebook under the names of different people, who owned those photographs as their own.
There were also photographs from the family of Zaidis. There were photographs depicting the style of saris in those times and the mannerism of the people in 40's.
After that schism, jihad and war against unjust rulers became an essential ingredient of belief for the Zaidis, who criticized Imam Muhammad and his followers for inaction against the Umayyad caliphs.
At the same time, many Zaidis and Twelver Shiites left Medina and immigrated to Iran.
Despite reservations about the deal, the Zaidis are taking part in the national dialogue launched in March to draft a constitution and prepare for elections.
A Salafist delegate to the national dialogue, Mohammed Shibiba, accused the Zaidis of being tools in the hands of Iran and likened them to Lebanon's Shiite militant movement Hezbollah.
Mohammad Abdul Adheem Al Houthi has always refused to accept leadership of Badr Al Deen Al Houthi as a top leader for the Zaidis in Sa'ada and Yemen as a whole.
He would always say that another cleric, Majid Al Deen Al Muayadi, was the top leader of Zaidis.
Summary: A Yemeni court on Tuesday ordered the execution of four more Zaidi rebels, raising the number on death row to 26, and jailed 11 others for up to 12 years for their role in violent clashes near Sanaa
The special court in Sanaa found the Zaidi Shiite defendants guilty of "forming an armed gang with the aim of implementing a criminal plot" as well as "causing the killing and wounding of many soldiers and policemen." The jail sentences ranged from five to 12 years.
are being waged against our culture," he said, adding that the government detains Zaidis "on ethnic and sectarian grounds".
According to AFP, he said his 90-year-old father Badr Eddine, a religious figure among the Zaidi community, is on a list of 55 wanted rebels.