Zaidis

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Zaidis

 

(also, Zaydis), the followers of a moderate Shiite sect, formed in the eighth century in the Abbasid Caliphate. The founder of the sect was Zayd ibn Ali, the grandson of the third Shiite imam Husayn. A Zaidi state existed in the ninth and tenth centuries in what is now Iran, in the regions of Gilan and Tabaristan. In the tenth century the Zaidis extended their power to part of Yemen, where the imams ruled until the revolution of Sept. 26, 1962. The Zaidis constitute a considerable part of the population of the Yemen Arab Republic. Theologically, the Zaidis follow the Mutazilites. Certain features of their way of life differentiate the Zaidis from other Shiites: they reject the doctrine of the “hidden imam,” the practice of the taqiya (the tactical dissimulation of faith), and temporary marriages.

REFERENCE

Beliaev, E. A.Musul’Manskoe sektantstvo. Moscow, 1957. 19957
References in periodicals archive ?
In fact, the most learned of the Shia ulema in Qom, Iran, know that the derogatory term Rafidah', now used in sectarian hate speech, was originally coined by Zaidiyyah scholars to describe those who reject the Zaidi position on the first two Caliphs in Islam.
The Sa'dah insurgency began in June of 2004 with a rebellion led by the Shiite cleric Hussein Badreddin al-Houthi, head of the Shia Zaidiyyah sect.
Saleh has also struggled to contain insurgency, which started in the northern area of Sa'dah in 2004 when the dissident cleric Hussein Badreddin Al Houthi, head of the Shia Zaidiyyah sect, started an uprising against the government in Sana'a.