Zalavruga

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Zalavruga

 

the largest single find of petroglyphs (about 1,200) on the White Sea. The site is located near the city of Belomorsk on the bank of the Zalavruga, a dried-up channel of the Vyg River. Some of them were found beneath a cultural level during the excavations of the site Zalavruga I (second half of the second millennium B.C., the transition period between the Neolithic and the Bronze Age). The individual figures of people and animals are depicted through the hammering or pecking of silhouettes on the granite rock surface. The same technique was used to depict entire scenes, including the scene of a winter hunt for elk and the scene of the hunt for the white whale.

REFERENCES

Ravdonikas, V.I .Naskalnye izobrazheniia Onezhskogo ozera i Be-logo moria, part 2. Moscow-Leningrad, 1938.
Savvateev, lu. A.Zalavruga. Arkheologicheskie pamiatniki nizov’ia reki Vyg, part 1. Leningrad, 1970.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Only one grave that can be dated to the period under consideration has been investigated in Karelia so far in Zalavruga II settlement site in lower reaches of Vyg River close to the south-western coast of the White Sea (Savvateev 1977, 187 ff.).
archaeology student at Cambridge University, studied around 3,500 rock art images from Namforsen in Northern Sweden and Zalavruga in Western Russia.
There are more than thirty rods in Alta, more than twenty in Vingen and Namforsen (Norway), four in Kanozero (Murmansk district), and two in Zalavruga (Karelia).
The latest belong to the final Neolithic or Eneolithic (Zalavruga).
Such depictions are also known in Namforsen, Kanozero and Zalavruga. In Alta and Vingen they are extremely rare.
Besides amber adornments, polished wood-chopping implements of the Russian-Karpelan type, slate rings, battle axes and their imitations, some obviously non-utilitarian types of flint arrowheads (for example those found in a burial construction on the site Zalavruga II (Savvateev 1977, 88) or in single grave in the settlement Il'insky Ostrov (Kozyreva 1971; Zhulnikov 2007).