Zaleucus


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Zaleucus

(zəlo͞o`kəs), fl. c.650 B.C., Greek lawgiver of Locris, in Italy. According to tradition, his was the earliest codification of Greek law. References to Zaleucus' code, which was widely adopted in Italy, indicate that it embodied the lex talionis [law of retaliation, i.e., an eye for an eye] and other severe features exemplified in the later Greek code of DracoDraco
or Dracon
, fl. 621 B.C., Athenian politician and law codifier. Of his codification of Athenian customary law only the section dealing with involuntary homicide is preserved.
..... Click the link for more information.
.
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
Zaleucus was the legislator of the Western Locrians, as was Charondas, the Catanean, of his own cities, and those also in Italy and Sicily which belonged to the Calcidians.
Minos, we learn, was the primitive founder of the government of Crete, as Zaleucus was of that of the Locrians.
As a deeply respected lawgiver (in the spirit of Solon, Cadrondas, or Zaleucus), Parmenides would have plenty of examples, (and was an awesome example), with no need to import something new from the Chandogya Upanihad, to teach an Elean kouros of their social and juridical duties in trustworthy speech (Galgano, 2017, p.
In The Federalist he noted that "in every case reported by ancient history, in which government has been established with deliberation and consent, the task of framing it has not been committed to an assembly of men, but has been performed by some individual citizen of pre-eminent wisdom and approved integrity." Then, after alluding to the tales told regarding Minos, Zaleucus, Theseus, Draco, Solon, Lycurgus, Romulus, Numa, Tullus Hostilius, Servius Tullius, and Brutus, he expressed his admiration for "the improvement made by America on the ancient mode of preparing and establishing regular plans of government."
Legal Light was bred from a British stallion called Zaleucus and a mare called Portia.
44), and Zaleucus's decision to blind himself in one eye in an attempt to meet both his duty as a father and as a lawgiver (pp.
(4) We all "recognize a statuesque woman with scales and [a] sword as Justice[,] but [we] have not been schooled in Cambyses, Zaleucus, and Brutus or provided with comparable sagas about the harshness of law and the weight of imposing judgment" (p.
Zaleucus, the earliest lawgiver, offers an interesting variant on the
Also portrayed was the Greek Zaleucus, who gouged out one of his own eyes as he also imposed that punishment on his son for violating the law.
From the unwritten laws of Lycurgus that created the foundations of the Spartan state, to the written laws of Solon in Athens, to Hippodamus on civic planning, Zaleucus on the divine source of laws, Philolaus on family laws and much more, Early Greek Lawgivers offers a fascinating glimpse into ideas and lives of notable figures in classical Greek history.
And the Locrians observed this custom in latter ages, being compelled to the observance of it by Zaleucus, their law-giver, whose rigour in executing this law is very remarkable; for having caught his son in Adultery, he resolved to deprive him of his sight, and remained a long time inexorable ..." (v).
He was also said to be a companion of the philosopher Thales, future teacher of the lawgiver Lycurgus and Zaleucus. The story of Onomacritus is a digression from its immediate context and, moreover, is regarded by Aristotle as false.