Zamenhof


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Zamenhof

Lazarus Ludwig . 1859--1917, Polish oculist; invented Esperanto
References in periodicals archive ?
"Warsaw to Name Street for Zamenhof, Esperanto Founder." August 20, 1930.
The pen name Zamenhof chose was Doktoro Esperanto - and people who started learning the new language simply called it by the "surname" of its author, Esperanto, which translates as "one who hopes".
En los primeros anos del Internet, el Unicode (7) no era el estandar ni para las paginas web, ni para las computadoras, de manera que no era posible utilizar libremente las letras del alfabeto del esperanto con diacriticos (es decir: C, c, G, g, H, h, J, j, S, s, U y u); aunque Zamenhof sugirio que en caso de dificultades se usara la letra base seguida de una "h" (Ch, ch, Gh, gh, Hh, hh, Jh, jh, Sh y sh; el complemento no era necesario para U y u), el recurso extraoficial utilizado consistio en recurrir a la "x" en vez de la hache (Cx, cx, Gx, gx, Hx, hx, Jx, jx, Sx y sx; el complemento no se utilizaba para U y u, las cuales permanecian igual o eran sustituidas por W y w).
The German linguist Jacob Grimm, however, was more far-sighted than Zamenhof, the inventor of Esperanto, when he stated in the mid-19th century that English would become the world's language.
In Krleza's Mars, God of Croatia (1922), the Catholic symbols on Croatian military uniforms render Christ "a barbaric fetish that soldiers condemned to death pin onto their filthy shirtfronts," while Zamenhof's After the War (1915) asks diplomats to rule that "every nation equally belongs to all of its sons."
This old joke plays on the fact that so many of Esperanto's early champions were, like its inventor, Ludwik Leyzer Zamenhof, Eastern European Jews.
Zamenhof planned it as an amalgam of various languages and published it in a book, the Unua Libro, in 1887.
Melvin Jules Bukiet brings us Franz Kafka as an impressionable boy in "The Two Franzes"; Joseph Skibell tracks down Ludwig Zamenhof, inventor of Esperanto, in a central European resort (excerpt from An Incurable Romantic); Dara Horn imagines Marc Chagall as an art teacher near Moscow, goading his students to paint with conviction (excerpt from The World to Come); Joseph Epstein gives us a biting, thinly-disguised portrait of Saul Bellow in "My Brother, Eli"; and Jonathan Rosen gives us the actual Saul Bellow, though we meet him in the afterlife, located just beyond Ellis Island, in "The True World".
schoolteacher, Zamenhof spoke Russian in the home and Polish in the