Zamyatin


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Zamyatin

Yevgenii Ivanovich . 1884--1937, Russian novelist and writer, in Paris from 1931, whose works include satirical studies of provincial life in Russia and England, where he worked during World War I, and the dystopian novel We (1924)
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
A writer and engineer of leftist, bent, Zamyatin wrote We in 1921, when the Communist "scientific dictatorship" in Russia was in its infancy.
(10.) Yevgeny Zamyatin, Islanders [Russia 1918] (London: Fontana Paperbacks, 1985), p.23.
Zamyatin's plays include Ogni svyatogo Dominika ( The Fires of St.
Lopez-Lozano postulates a genre for these works by suggestively comparing them (albeit in passing) with Zamyatin's We, Huxley's Brave New World, Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four, and Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451.
dystopian novel We by Yevgeny Zamyatin, which describes a completely
The human anthills of twentieth-century dystopian fiction--Yevgeny Zamyatin's We, Victor Rousseau's Messiah of the Cylinders, Aldous Huxley's Brave New World, Bernard Wolfe's Limbo, Kurt Vonnegut's Player Piano, Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451-with their child-like, ovine citizens and paternalistic dictators, stem, directly or indirectly, from Dostoevsky's Legend: the Grand Inquisitor stands as the prototype of all the Big Brothers of literature--and of history.
For Jameson, the distinction is quite clear: wherever such a consciousness is present, the future vision can be considered dystopian (think here, for example, of the classic works of this genre, Yevgeny Zamyatin's We, Aldous Huxley's Brave New World, George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four).
The misbegotten ideal of technocracy was brilliantly satirized in Yevgeny Zamyatin's We, written in 1920-21, just as the Soviet Union was being established as its purest historical incarnation.
Finn Carling's brief narrative, whose title alludes ironically to the expression "frokost i det gronne" (breakfast in the open air) and could be rendered, in view of the book's content, as "Breakfast a la Solitaire," contains several elements known from previous dystopian novels: Zamyatin's We, Huxley's Brave New World, and Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four.
Zamyatin, Yevgeny Ivanovich or Zamiatin, Yevgeny Ivanovich (b.
Almost all of the suppressed classics of Soviet literature are now being published, including the works of Platonov, Zamyatin, Pasternak, and Bulgakov.
With the final chapter "The Perfect World?," the book ends with a look at utopia/dystopia and the idea of social and human perfectability, from Plato, More, and Bacon, through nineteenth-century socialist utopias and twentieth-century totalitarian dystopias (Zamyatin, Orwell), to the feminist utopian and dystopian worlds of Charlotte Perkins Gilman and Margaret Atwood.